Masculinity Matters for Meat Consumption: An Examination of Self-Rated Gender Typicality, Meat Consumption, and Veg*nism in Australian Men and Women

Samantha K. Stanley, Cameron Day, Patricia M. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)
130 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Previous research shows that men eat more meat than women. We explore the extent to which self-rated gender typicality explains differences in meat consumption intentions and behaviour. We recruited a large sample (N = 4897) of Australian men and women to complete an online survey about their attitudes and intentions regarding meat consumption and abstention and measured their self-rated gender typicality (the extent men view themselves as masculine, and women view themselves as feminine). We used moderated regression analyses to investigate self-rated gender typicality as a moderator of the relationship between gender and meat-related variables. We demonstrated that for men, identifying as more masculine was associated with a lower likelihood of reducing meat consumption or considering veg*nism, and a greater belief that eating meat is normal. We also found that men, and those with more gender-typical self-ratings (regardless of gender), viewed meat as more natural, necessary, and nice. These findings suggest that self-rated gender typicality may be relevant for understanding gender differences in meat consumption behaviours. Appeals to adopt low- or no-meat diets may be more effective if they consider the ways Australian diets are interconnected with genders and identities. Increasing acceptance of alternative masculinities, and developing masculinity-friendly advertising of plant-based foods, could be useful in promoting meat reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-198
Number of pages12
JournalSex Roles
Volume88
Issue number3-4
Early online date3 Feb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2023

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