Measuring ‘magnetism’ in Australian nursing environments.

Joanne Joyce-McCoach, Patrick CROOKES

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective The aim of this research project was to use the NWI‑R:A tool to measure the organisational
features that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities. Design The cross sectional survey
questionnaire incorporated the Nursing Work Index‑Revised: Australian (NWI‑R:A) developed by Joyce
and Crookes (2007). Subjects Participants were registered nursing staff (n=262) including ward nurses and
managers within a group of four Australian hospitals.Main outcome measures To measure the
organisational features that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities using the NWI‑R:A tool
specifically developed for the Australian context. Results The results have identified a number of consistent
patterns in nursing staff views in relation to the magnet features present in their current practice environment.
The findings have affirmed results reported by Joyce and Crookes (2007) that respondents in the Australian
surveys consider positively, the quality of care and the level of support from management in their workplace.
The calibre of leadership and support was also considered favourably as were the relationships between health
professionals. Conversely the respondents indicated their workplace provided insufficient nurse participation
in decision making and inadequate staffing and resources for practice. Conclusions The establishment of a
tool for the reliable measurement of magnetism in Australian facilities allows for the transferability of the
magnet concept to Australia. A better understanding of nursing staff perceptions on the presence of magnet
features in their workplace can be used to inform the development of magnetism in Australian health facilities.
This research develops the concept of `magnetism’ to health organisations in Australia extending on existing
research. By using the magnet framework to underpin the planning and development of organisational
governance administrators and managers will be well positioned to improve staff retention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-22
Number of pages10
JournalAustralian Journal of Advanced Nursing
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Nursing Staff
Health Facilities
Workplace
Nursing
Magnets
Nurses
Quality of Health Care
Administrative Personnel
Research
Decision Making
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Organizations
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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title = "Measuring ‘magnetism’ in Australian nursing environments.",
abstract = "Objective The aim of this research project was to use the NWI‑R:A tool to measure the organisationalfeatures that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities. Design The cross sectional surveyquestionnaire incorporated the Nursing Work Index‑Revised: Australian (NWI‑R:A) developed by Joyceand Crookes (2007). Subjects Participants were registered nursing staff (n=262) including ward nurses andmanagers within a group of four Australian hospitals.Main outcome measures To measure theorganisational features that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities using the NWI‑R:A toolspecifically developed for the Australian context. Results The results have identified a number of consistentpatterns in nursing staff views in relation to the magnet features present in their current practice environment.The findings have affirmed results reported by Joyce and Crookes (2007) that respondents in the Australiansurveys consider positively, the quality of care and the level of support from management in their workplace.The calibre of leadership and support was also considered favourably as were the relationships between healthprofessionals. Conversely the respondents indicated their workplace provided insufficient nurse participationin decision making and inadequate staffing and resources for practice. Conclusions The establishment of atool for the reliable measurement of magnetism in Australian facilities allows for the transferability of themagnet concept to Australia. A better understanding of nursing staff perceptions on the presence of magnetfeatures in their workplace can be used to inform the development of magnetism in Australian health facilities.This research develops the concept of `magnetism’ to health organisations in Australia extending on existingresearch. By using the magnet framework to underpin the planning and development of organisationalgovernance administrators and managers will be well positioned to improve staff retention.",
author = "Joanne Joyce-McCoach and Patrick CROOKES",
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Measuring ‘magnetism’ in Australian nursing environments. / Joyce-McCoach, Joanne; CROOKES, Patrick.

In: Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 2011, p. 13-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objective The aim of this research project was to use the NWI‑R:A tool to measure the organisationalfeatures that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities. Design The cross sectional surveyquestionnaire incorporated the Nursing Work Index‑Revised: Australian (NWI‑R:A) developed by Joyceand Crookes (2007). Subjects Participants were registered nursing staff (n=262) including ward nurses andmanagers within a group of four Australian hospitals.Main outcome measures To measure theorganisational features that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities using the NWI‑R:A toolspecifically developed for the Australian context. Results The results have identified a number of consistentpatterns in nursing staff views in relation to the magnet features present in their current practice environment.The findings have affirmed results reported by Joyce and Crookes (2007) that respondents in the Australiansurveys consider positively, the quality of care and the level of support from management in their workplace.The calibre of leadership and support was also considered favourably as were the relationships between healthprofessionals. Conversely the respondents indicated their workplace provided insufficient nurse participationin decision making and inadequate staffing and resources for practice. Conclusions The establishment of atool for the reliable measurement of magnetism in Australian facilities allows for the transferability of themagnet concept to Australia. A better understanding of nursing staff perceptions on the presence of magnetfeatures in their workplace can be used to inform the development of magnetism in Australian health facilities.This research develops the concept of `magnetism’ to health organisations in Australia extending on existingresearch. By using the magnet framework to underpin the planning and development of organisationalgovernance administrators and managers will be well positioned to improve staff retention.

AB - Objective The aim of this research project was to use the NWI‑R:A tool to measure the organisationalfeatures that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities. Design The cross sectional surveyquestionnaire incorporated the Nursing Work Index‑Revised: Australian (NWI‑R:A) developed by Joyceand Crookes (2007). Subjects Participants were registered nursing staff (n=262) including ward nurses andmanagers within a group of four Australian hospitals.Main outcome measures To measure theorganisational features that impact on ‘magnetism’ in Australian health facilities using the NWI‑R:A toolspecifically developed for the Australian context. Results The results have identified a number of consistentpatterns in nursing staff views in relation to the magnet features present in their current practice environment.The findings have affirmed results reported by Joyce and Crookes (2007) that respondents in the Australiansurveys consider positively, the quality of care and the level of support from management in their workplace.The calibre of leadership and support was also considered favourably as were the relationships between healthprofessionals. Conversely the respondents indicated their workplace provided insufficient nurse participationin decision making and inadequate staffing and resources for practice. Conclusions The establishment of atool for the reliable measurement of magnetism in Australian facilities allows for the transferability of themagnet concept to Australia. A better understanding of nursing staff perceptions on the presence of magnetfeatures in their workplace can be used to inform the development of magnetism in Australian health facilities.This research develops the concept of `magnetism’ to health organisations in Australia extending on existingresearch. By using the magnet framework to underpin the planning and development of organisationalgovernance administrators and managers will be well positioned to improve staff retention.

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