Mental health literacy in Singapore: A comparative survey of psychiatrists and primary health professionals

H Chen, G. Parker, J. Kua, A. Jorm, J. Loh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the beliefs amongst health professionals in Singapore about management of 3 major mental disorders, comparing psychiatrists and a sample of primary care physicians, and so identify target areas for the education of primary health professionals.

Materials and Method: A questionnaire earlier distributed to psychiatrists at Woodbridge Hospital was posted to both Singapore general practitioners andpolyclinic doctors. The questionnaire assessed the capacity of respondents to identify vignettes of depression, schizophrenia or mania, and then assessed respondents' views about the likely helpfulness of a number of interventions.

Results: The psychiatrists and primary health professionals differed little in terms of diagnostic accuracy for depression and schizophrenia; however, only half the general practitioners and three-quarters of the polyclinic doctors correctly diagnosed mania, which was consistently diagnosed by the psychiatrists. A number of distinct differences were identified between the groups concerning the likely helpfulness and disorder specificity of various psychotropic drugs. The primary health physicians were more likely to favour non-specific management approaches, whilst the psychiatrists generally supported a focused biological approach to treatment, especially for the psychotic disorders. Some of the differences in beliefs about mental health management may well be contributed by the different patients treated by each group of clinicians.

Conclusions: The findings have important clinical implications in terms of diagnosing common psychiatric conditions accurately and giving us professionals' views about a range of interventions for such conditions, while also assisting review of educational programmes for identifying and managing major mental disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-473
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore
Volume29
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Singapore
Psychiatry
Mental Health
Health
Bipolar Disorder
Mental Disorders
General Practitioners
Schizophrenia
Depression
Psychotropic Drugs
Primary Care Physicians
Health Education
Psychotic Disorders
Surveys and Questionnaires
Physicians

Cite this

@article{566551f89d44498eb86f5f80d7a1c202,
title = "Mental health literacy in Singapore: A comparative survey of psychiatrists and primary health professionals",
abstract = "Objectives: To assess the beliefs amongst health professionals in Singapore about management of 3 major mental disorders, comparing psychiatrists and a sample of primary care physicians, and so identify target areas for the education of primary health professionals. Materials and Method: A questionnaire earlier distributed to psychiatrists at Woodbridge Hospital was posted to both Singapore general practitioners andpolyclinic doctors. The questionnaire assessed the capacity of respondents to identify vignettes of depression, schizophrenia or mania, and then assessed respondents' views about the likely helpfulness of a number of interventions. Results: The psychiatrists and primary health professionals differed little in terms of diagnostic accuracy for depression and schizophrenia; however, only half the general practitioners and three-quarters of the polyclinic doctors correctly diagnosed mania, which was consistently diagnosed by the psychiatrists. A number of distinct differences were identified between the groups concerning the likely helpfulness and disorder specificity of various psychotropic drugs. The primary health physicians were more likely to favour non-specific management approaches, whilst the psychiatrists generally supported a focused biological approach to treatment, especially for the psychotic disorders. Some of the differences in beliefs about mental health management may well be contributed by the different patients treated by each group of clinicians. Conclusions: The findings have important clinical implications in terms of diagnosing common psychiatric conditions accurately and giving us professionals' views about a range of interventions for such conditions, while also assisting review of educational programmes for identifying and managing major mental disorders.",
keywords = "Depression, Mania, Mental health surveys, Schizophrenia",
author = "H Chen and G. Parker and J. Kua and A. Jorm and J. Loh",
year = "2000",
month = "7",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "467--473",
journal = "Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore",
issn = "0304-4602",
publisher = "Academy of Medicine Singapore",
number = "4",

}

Mental health literacy in Singapore: A comparative survey of psychiatrists and primary health professionals. / Chen, H; Parker, G.; Kua, J.; Jorm, A.; Loh, J.

In: Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore, Vol. 29, No. 4, 07.2000, p. 467-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mental health literacy in Singapore: A comparative survey of psychiatrists and primary health professionals

AU - Chen, H

AU - Parker, G.

AU - Kua, J.

AU - Jorm, A.

AU - Loh, J.

PY - 2000/7

Y1 - 2000/7

N2 - Objectives: To assess the beliefs amongst health professionals in Singapore about management of 3 major mental disorders, comparing psychiatrists and a sample of primary care physicians, and so identify target areas for the education of primary health professionals. Materials and Method: A questionnaire earlier distributed to psychiatrists at Woodbridge Hospital was posted to both Singapore general practitioners andpolyclinic doctors. The questionnaire assessed the capacity of respondents to identify vignettes of depression, schizophrenia or mania, and then assessed respondents' views about the likely helpfulness of a number of interventions. Results: The psychiatrists and primary health professionals differed little in terms of diagnostic accuracy for depression and schizophrenia; however, only half the general practitioners and three-quarters of the polyclinic doctors correctly diagnosed mania, which was consistently diagnosed by the psychiatrists. A number of distinct differences were identified between the groups concerning the likely helpfulness and disorder specificity of various psychotropic drugs. The primary health physicians were more likely to favour non-specific management approaches, whilst the psychiatrists generally supported a focused biological approach to treatment, especially for the psychotic disorders. Some of the differences in beliefs about mental health management may well be contributed by the different patients treated by each group of clinicians. Conclusions: The findings have important clinical implications in terms of diagnosing common psychiatric conditions accurately and giving us professionals' views about a range of interventions for such conditions, while also assisting review of educational programmes for identifying and managing major mental disorders.

AB - Objectives: To assess the beliefs amongst health professionals in Singapore about management of 3 major mental disorders, comparing psychiatrists and a sample of primary care physicians, and so identify target areas for the education of primary health professionals. Materials and Method: A questionnaire earlier distributed to psychiatrists at Woodbridge Hospital was posted to both Singapore general practitioners andpolyclinic doctors. The questionnaire assessed the capacity of respondents to identify vignettes of depression, schizophrenia or mania, and then assessed respondents' views about the likely helpfulness of a number of interventions. Results: The psychiatrists and primary health professionals differed little in terms of diagnostic accuracy for depression and schizophrenia; however, only half the general practitioners and three-quarters of the polyclinic doctors correctly diagnosed mania, which was consistently diagnosed by the psychiatrists. A number of distinct differences were identified between the groups concerning the likely helpfulness and disorder specificity of various psychotropic drugs. The primary health physicians were more likely to favour non-specific management approaches, whilst the psychiatrists generally supported a focused biological approach to treatment, especially for the psychotic disorders. Some of the differences in beliefs about mental health management may well be contributed by the different patients treated by each group of clinicians. Conclusions: The findings have important clinical implications in terms of diagnosing common psychiatric conditions accurately and giving us professionals' views about a range of interventions for such conditions, while also assisting review of educational programmes for identifying and managing major mental disorders.

KW - Depression

KW - Mania

KW - Mental health surveys

KW - Schizophrenia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034231170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

VL - 29

SP - 467

EP - 473

JO - Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore

JF - Annals of the Academy of Medicine Singapore

SN - 0304-4602

IS - 4

ER -