Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research

A Literature Review

Brenda Happell, Sarah Gordon, Julia Bocking, Pete Ellis, Cath Roper, Jackie Liggins, Chris Platania-Phung, Brett Scholz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Services users are becoming actively involved in mental health research. How this is perceived by other researchers is not well known. The aim of this article is to review the international literature exploring other mental health researchers’ views of service users conducting research, between 1996 and 2016. Searches of multiple databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar) were undertaken. Combinations of terms related to service user research and mental health researcher perspectives, views, and attitudes were used. Manual inquiry of reference lists was also undertaken. Relevant papers were coded by topic, location, study design, and other dimensions. Five articles met inclusion criteria. Most referred to perceived benefits, such as greater validity of research findings, challenges of collaborating with service users, and the validity of research findings. There was some evidence of more openness to mental health service users providing suggestions, preferably in early stages of the research process. Reluctance to co-research with service users was reported. There is limited research directly addressing other mental health researchers’ views about service user research; barriers to inclusion (whether involvement, co-production or user-controlled) and creating incongruence with health policy statements. Further research to more fully understand these attitudes and how they might be influenced is warranted.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1010-1016
    Number of pages7
    JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
    Volume39
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2018

    Fingerprint

    Mental Health
    Research Personnel
    Research
    Mental Health Services
    Health Services Research
    Health Policy
    PubMed
    Databases

    Cite this

    Happell, B., Gordon, S., Bocking, J., Ellis, P., Roper, C., Liggins, J., ... Scholz, B. (2018). Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research: A Literature Review. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 39(12), 1010-1016. https://doi.org/10.1080/01612840.2018.1475524
    Happell, Brenda ; Gordon, Sarah ; Bocking, Julia ; Ellis, Pete ; Roper, Cath ; Liggins, Jackie ; Platania-Phung, Chris ; Scholz, Brett. / Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research : A Literature Review. In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 12. pp. 1010-1016.
    @article{39fe61972952478da7bf01cc6f4ff57b,
    title = "Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research: A Literature Review",
    abstract = "Services users are becoming actively involved in mental health research. How this is perceived by other researchers is not well known. The aim of this article is to review the international literature exploring other mental health researchers’ views of service users conducting research, between 1996 and 2016. Searches of multiple databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar) were undertaken. Combinations of terms related to service user research and mental health researcher perspectives, views, and attitudes were used. Manual inquiry of reference lists was also undertaken. Relevant papers were coded by topic, location, study design, and other dimensions. Five articles met inclusion criteria. Most referred to perceived benefits, such as greater validity of research findings, challenges of collaborating with service users, and the validity of research findings. There was some evidence of more openness to mental health service users providing suggestions, preferably in early stages of the research process. Reluctance to co-research with service users was reported. There is limited research directly addressing other mental health researchers’ views about service user research; barriers to inclusion (whether involvement, co-production or user-controlled) and creating incongruence with health policy statements. Further research to more fully understand these attitudes and how they might be influenced is warranted.",
    author = "Brenda Happell and Sarah Gordon and Julia Bocking and Pete Ellis and Cath Roper and Jackie Liggins and Chris Platania-Phung and Brett Scholz",
    year = "2018",
    month = "12",
    day = "2",
    doi = "10.1080/01612840.2018.1475524",
    language = "English",
    volume = "39",
    pages = "1010--1016",
    journal = "Issues in Mental Health Nursing",
    issn = "0161-2840",
    publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
    number = "12",

    }

    Happell, B, Gordon, S, Bocking, J, Ellis, P, Roper, C, Liggins, J, Platania-Phung, C & Scholz, B 2018, 'Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research: A Literature Review', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 39, no. 12, pp. 1010-1016. https://doi.org/10.1080/01612840.2018.1475524

    Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research : A Literature Review. / Happell, Brenda; Gordon, Sarah; Bocking, Julia; Ellis, Pete; Roper, Cath; Liggins, Jackie; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scholz, Brett.

    In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 39, No. 12, 02.12.2018, p. 1010-1016.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Mental Health Researchers’ Views About Service User Research

    T2 - A Literature Review

    AU - Happell, Brenda

    AU - Gordon, Sarah

    AU - Bocking, Julia

    AU - Ellis, Pete

    AU - Roper, Cath

    AU - Liggins, Jackie

    AU - Platania-Phung, Chris

    AU - Scholz, Brett

    PY - 2018/12/2

    Y1 - 2018/12/2

    N2 - Services users are becoming actively involved in mental health research. How this is perceived by other researchers is not well known. The aim of this article is to review the international literature exploring other mental health researchers’ views of service users conducting research, between 1996 and 2016. Searches of multiple databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar) were undertaken. Combinations of terms related to service user research and mental health researcher perspectives, views, and attitudes were used. Manual inquiry of reference lists was also undertaken. Relevant papers were coded by topic, location, study design, and other dimensions. Five articles met inclusion criteria. Most referred to perceived benefits, such as greater validity of research findings, challenges of collaborating with service users, and the validity of research findings. There was some evidence of more openness to mental health service users providing suggestions, preferably in early stages of the research process. Reluctance to co-research with service users was reported. There is limited research directly addressing other mental health researchers’ views about service user research; barriers to inclusion (whether involvement, co-production or user-controlled) and creating incongruence with health policy statements. Further research to more fully understand these attitudes and how they might be influenced is warranted.

    AB - Services users are becoming actively involved in mental health research. How this is perceived by other researchers is not well known. The aim of this article is to review the international literature exploring other mental health researchers’ views of service users conducting research, between 1996 and 2016. Searches of multiple databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar) were undertaken. Combinations of terms related to service user research and mental health researcher perspectives, views, and attitudes were used. Manual inquiry of reference lists was also undertaken. Relevant papers were coded by topic, location, study design, and other dimensions. Five articles met inclusion criteria. Most referred to perceived benefits, such as greater validity of research findings, challenges of collaborating with service users, and the validity of research findings. There was some evidence of more openness to mental health service users providing suggestions, preferably in early stages of the research process. Reluctance to co-research with service users was reported. There is limited research directly addressing other mental health researchers’ views about service user research; barriers to inclusion (whether involvement, co-production or user-controlled) and creating incongruence with health policy statements. Further research to more fully understand these attitudes and how they might be influenced is warranted.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062952094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/mental-health-researchers-views-about-service-user-research-literature-review

    U2 - 10.1080/01612840.2018.1475524

    DO - 10.1080/01612840.2018.1475524

    M3 - Article

    VL - 39

    SP - 1010

    EP - 1016

    JO - Issues in Mental Health Nursing

    JF - Issues in Mental Health Nursing

    SN - 0161-2840

    IS - 12

    ER -