Metagovernance, Network Structure and Legitimacy: Developing a Heuristic for Comparative Governance Analysis

Carsten Daugbjerb, Paul FAWCETT

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article develops a heuristic for comparative governance analysis. The heuristic depicts four network types by combining network structure with the state’s capacity to metagovern. It suggests that each network type produces a particular combination of input and output legitimacy. We illustrate the heuristic and its utility using a comparative study of agri-food networks (organic farming and land use) in four countries, which each exhibit different combinations of input and output legitimacy respectively. The article concludes by using a fifth case study to illustrate what a network type that produces high levels of input and output legitimacy might look like.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1223-1245
    Number of pages22
    JournalAdministration and Society
    Volume49
    Issue number9
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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    heuristics
    legitimacy
    governance
    organic farming
    land use
    Governance
    Network structure
    Legitimacy
    Heuristics
    food

    Cite this

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    abstract = "This article develops a heuristic for comparative governance analysis. The heuristic depicts four network types by combining network structure with the state’s capacity to metagovern. It suggests that each network type produces a particular combination of input and output legitimacy. We illustrate the heuristic and its utility using a comparative study of agri-food networks (organic farming and land use) in four countries, which each exhibit different combinations of input and output legitimacy respectively. The article concludes by using a fifth case study to illustrate what a network type that produces high levels of input and output legitimacy might look like.",
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    Metagovernance, Network Structure and Legitimacy: Developing a Heuristic for Comparative Governance Analysis. / Daugbjerb, Carsten; FAWCETT, Paul.

    In: Administration and Society, Vol. 49, No. 9, 2017, p. 1223-1245.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - FAWCETT, Paul

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    AB - This article develops a heuristic for comparative governance analysis. The heuristic depicts four network types by combining network structure with the state’s capacity to metagovern. It suggests that each network type produces a particular combination of input and output legitimacy. We illustrate the heuristic and its utility using a comparative study of agri-food networks (organic farming and land use) in four countries, which each exhibit different combinations of input and output legitimacy respectively. The article concludes by using a fifth case study to illustrate what a network type that produces high levels of input and output legitimacy might look like.

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