Midday Napping and Successful Aging in Older People Living in the Mediterranean Region: The Epidemiological Mediterranean Islands Study (MEDIS)

Alexandra Foscolou, Nathan M D'Cunha, Nenad Naumovski, Stefanos Tyrovolas, Loukianos Rallidis, Antonia-Leda Matalas, Evangelos Polychronopoulos, Labros S Sidossis, Demosthenes Panagiotakos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
48 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between midday napping, sleeping hours, and successful aging among 2564 older (65+ years) individuals living in the insular Mediterranean region. Anthropometric, clinical, and socio-demographic characteristics, dietary habits, and lifestyle parameters were derived through standard procedures, while successful aging was evaluated using the validated Successful Aging Index (SAI; range 0-10). Of the 2564 participants, 74% reported midday napping. The SAI score was 2.9/10 for non-midday nappers vs. 3.5/10 for midday nappers (p = 0.001). Midday nappers were more likely to be physically active (p = 0.01) and to have higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (p = 0.02) compared to non-midday nappers. In a fully adjusted model, midday nappers had 6.7% higher SAI score compared to the rest (p < 0.001), and the effect of midday napping was more prominent among males and participants 80+ years of age. Further analysis indicated a significant U-shaped trend between sleeping hours/day and SAI score (p < 0.001), with 8-9 h total of sleep/day, midday napping included, proposed as optimal in achieving the best SAI score. Midday napping seems to be a beneficial habit that should be promoted and encouraged in older people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume10
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

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