Models of Care Delivery for Families of Critically Ill Children: An Integrative Review of International Literature

Kate Curtis, Kim FOSTER, Rebecca Mitchell, Connie Van

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)
    2 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Critical illness in children is a life changing event for the child, their parents, caregivers and wider family. There is a need to design and evaluate models of care that aim to implement family-centred care to support more positive outcomes for critically ill children and their families. Due to a gap in knowledge on the impact of such models, the present review was conducted. Eligibility criteria: Primary research articles written in English that focused on children hospitalised for an acute, unexpected, sudden critical illness, such as that requiring an intensive care admission; and addressed the implementation of a model of care in a paediatric acute care hospital setting. Sample: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: The models of care implemented were associated with positive changes such as reduced parental anxiety and improved communication between parents/caregivers and health professionals. However, no model provided intervention throughout each phase of care to (or post) hospital discharge. Conclusions: Models of care applying family-centred care principles targeting critically ill children and their families can create positive changes in care delivery for the family. However a model which provides continuity across the span of care is required. Implications: There is need to describe how best to design, implement and sustain models of care for critically ill children and their families. The success of any intervention implementation will be dependent on the comprehensiveness of the strategy for implementation, the relevance to the context and setting, and engagement with key stakeholders.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)330-341
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
    Volume31
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Critical Illness
    Caregivers
    Parents
    Hospitalized Child
    Critical Care
    Anxiety
    Communication
    Pediatrics
    Health
    Research

    Cite this

    Curtis, Kate ; FOSTER, Kim ; Mitchell, Rebecca ; Van, Connie. / Models of Care Delivery for Families of Critically Ill Children: An Integrative Review of International Literature. In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 330-341.
    @article{7794f7a71ec44962bbf1e13a578b4021,
    title = "Models of Care Delivery for Families of Critically Ill Children: An Integrative Review of International Literature",
    abstract = "Critical illness in children is a life changing event for the child, their parents, caregivers and wider family. There is a need to design and evaluate models of care that aim to implement family-centred care to support more positive outcomes for critically ill children and their families. Due to a gap in knowledge on the impact of such models, the present review was conducted. Eligibility criteria: Primary research articles written in English that focused on children hospitalised for an acute, unexpected, sudden critical illness, such as that requiring an intensive care admission; and addressed the implementation of a model of care in a paediatric acute care hospital setting. Sample: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: The models of care implemented were associated with positive changes such as reduced parental anxiety and improved communication between parents/caregivers and health professionals. However, no model provided intervention throughout each phase of care to (or post) hospital discharge. Conclusions: Models of care applying family-centred care principles targeting critically ill children and their families can create positive changes in care delivery for the family. However a model which provides continuity across the span of care is required. Implications: There is need to describe how best to design, implement and sustain models of care for critically ill children and their families. The success of any intervention implementation will be dependent on the comprehensiveness of the strategy for implementation, the relevance to the context and setting, and engagement with key stakeholders.",
    keywords = "Families, Family-centred care, Interventions, Models, Parents, Pediatric",
    author = "Kate Curtis and Kim FOSTER and Rebecca Mitchell and Connie Van",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1016/j.pedn.2015.11.009",
    language = "English",
    volume = "31",
    pages = "330--341",
    journal = "Journal of Pediatric Nursing",
    issn = "0882-5963",
    publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
    number = "3",

    }

    Models of Care Delivery for Families of Critically Ill Children: An Integrative Review of International Literature. / Curtis, Kate; FOSTER, Kim; Mitchell, Rebecca; Van, Connie.

    In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 3, 2016, p. 330-341.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Models of Care Delivery for Families of Critically Ill Children: An Integrative Review of International Literature

    AU - Curtis, Kate

    AU - FOSTER, Kim

    AU - Mitchell, Rebecca

    AU - Van, Connie

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Critical illness in children is a life changing event for the child, their parents, caregivers and wider family. There is a need to design and evaluate models of care that aim to implement family-centred care to support more positive outcomes for critically ill children and their families. Due to a gap in knowledge on the impact of such models, the present review was conducted. Eligibility criteria: Primary research articles written in English that focused on children hospitalised for an acute, unexpected, sudden critical illness, such as that requiring an intensive care admission; and addressed the implementation of a model of care in a paediatric acute care hospital setting. Sample: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: The models of care implemented were associated with positive changes such as reduced parental anxiety and improved communication between parents/caregivers and health professionals. However, no model provided intervention throughout each phase of care to (or post) hospital discharge. Conclusions: Models of care applying family-centred care principles targeting critically ill children and their families can create positive changes in care delivery for the family. However a model which provides continuity across the span of care is required. Implications: There is need to describe how best to design, implement and sustain models of care for critically ill children and their families. The success of any intervention implementation will be dependent on the comprehensiveness of the strategy for implementation, the relevance to the context and setting, and engagement with key stakeholders.

    AB - Critical illness in children is a life changing event for the child, their parents, caregivers and wider family. There is a need to design and evaluate models of care that aim to implement family-centred care to support more positive outcomes for critically ill children and their families. Due to a gap in knowledge on the impact of such models, the present review was conducted. Eligibility criteria: Primary research articles written in English that focused on children hospitalised for an acute, unexpected, sudden critical illness, such as that requiring an intensive care admission; and addressed the implementation of a model of care in a paediatric acute care hospital setting. Sample: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: The models of care implemented were associated with positive changes such as reduced parental anxiety and improved communication between parents/caregivers and health professionals. However, no model provided intervention throughout each phase of care to (or post) hospital discharge. Conclusions: Models of care applying family-centred care principles targeting critically ill children and their families can create positive changes in care delivery for the family. However a model which provides continuity across the span of care is required. Implications: There is need to describe how best to design, implement and sustain models of care for critically ill children and their families. The success of any intervention implementation will be dependent on the comprehensiveness of the strategy for implementation, the relevance to the context and setting, and engagement with key stakeholders.

    KW - Families

    KW - Family-centred care

    KW - Interventions

    KW - Models

    KW - Parents

    KW - Pediatric

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949818848&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1016/j.pedn.2015.11.009

    DO - 10.1016/j.pedn.2015.11.009

    M3 - Article

    VL - 31

    SP - 330

    EP - 341

    JO - Journal of Pediatric Nursing

    JF - Journal of Pediatric Nursing

    SN - 0882-5963

    IS - 3

    ER -