Motor adaptation varies between individuals in the transition to sustained pain

Simon J Summers, Lucy S Chipchase, Rogerio Hirata, Thomas Graven-Nielsen, Rocco Cavaleri, Siobhan M Schabrun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Musculoskeletal pain is associated with altered motor control that despite short-term benefit, is hypothesised to have long-term consequences, contributing to the development of chronic pain. However, data on how motor control is altered when pain is sustained beyond a transient event are scarce. Here, we investigated motor adaptation, and its relationship to corticomotor excitability, in the transition to sustained muscle pain. Twenty-eight healthy individuals were injected with nerve growth factor (NGF) into the right extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscle on Days 0 and 2. Motor adaptation and corticomotor excitability were assessed on Day -2, prior to injection on Days 0 and 2, and again on Days 4 and 14. Motor adaptation was quantified during a radial-ulnar movement as kinematic variability of wrist flexion-extension and pronation-supination, and as electromyographic (EMG) variability of ECRB activity. Pain, muscle soreness, and functional limitation were assessed from Days 0-14. Pain, muscle soreness and functional limitation were evident at Days 2 and 4 (p<0.001). EMG variability reduced at Days 4 and 14 (p<0.04), with no change in kinematic variability (p=0.9). However, data revealed variation in EMG and kinematic variability between individuals: some displayed increased motor variability while others a decrease. Individuals who displayed an increase in EMG variability following four days of pain also displayed an increase in corticomotor excitability (r=0.43, p=0.034). These findings suggest individual adaptation of the motor system in the transition to sustained pain that could have implications for clinical musculoskeletal pain disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-42
Number of pages42
JournalPain
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 May 2019

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Myalgia
Pain
Biomechanical Phenomena
Musculoskeletal Pain
Pronation
Supination
Somatoform Disorders
Nerve Growth Factor
Wrist
Chronic Pain
Muscles
Injections

Cite this

Summers, S. J., Chipchase, L. S., Hirata, R., Graven-Nielsen, T., Cavaleri, R., & Schabrun, S. M. (2019). Motor adaptation varies between individuals in the transition to sustained pain. Pain, 1-42. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001604
Summers, Simon J ; Chipchase, Lucy S ; Hirata, Rogerio ; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas ; Cavaleri, Rocco ; Schabrun, Siobhan M. / Motor adaptation varies between individuals in the transition to sustained pain. In: Pain. 2019 ; pp. 1-42.
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Summers, SJ, Chipchase, LS, Hirata, R, Graven-Nielsen, T, Cavaleri, R & Schabrun, SM 2019, 'Motor adaptation varies between individuals in the transition to sustained pain', Pain, pp. 1-42. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001604

Motor adaptation varies between individuals in the transition to sustained pain. / Summers, Simon J; Chipchase, Lucy S; Hirata, Rogerio; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Cavaleri, Rocco; Schabrun, Siobhan M.

In: Pain, 08.05.2019, p. 1-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Chipchase, Lucy S

AU - Hirata, Rogerio

AU - Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

AU - Cavaleri, Rocco

AU - Schabrun, Siobhan M

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Summers SJ, Chipchase LS, Hirata R, Graven-Nielsen T, Cavaleri R, Schabrun SM. Motor adaptation varies between individuals in the transition to sustained pain. Pain. 2019 May 8;1-42. https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001604