Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets

Deborah Schofield, Emily Callander, Rupendra Shrestha, Megan Passey, Simon Kelly, Richard Percival

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: There has been little research on the economic status of those with multiple health conditions, particularly on the relationship between multiple health conditions and wealth. This paper will assess the difference in the value and type of wealth assets held by Australians who have multiple chronic health conditions. Methods: Using HealthWealthMOD, a microsimulation model of the 45-64-year-old Australian population in 2009, a counterfactual analysis was undertaken. The actual proportion of people with different numbers of chronic health conditions with any wealth, and the value of this wealth was estimated. This was compared with the counterfactual values had the individuals had no chronic health conditions. Results: There was no change in the proportion of people with one health condition who actually had any wealth, compared to the counterfactual proportion had they had no chronic health conditions. Ninety-four percent of those with four or more health conditions had some accumulated wealth; however, under the counterfactual, 100% would have had some accumulated wealth. There was little change in the value of non-income-producing assets under the counterfactual, regardless of number of health conditions. Those with four or more chronic health conditions had a mean value of $17 000 in income-producing assets; under the counterfactual, the average would have been $78 000. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the variation in the value of wealth according to number of chronic health conditions, and hence the importance of considering multiple morbidities when discussing the relationship between health and wealth.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)285-289
    Number of pages5
    JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
    Volume25
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Health
    Multiple Chronic Conditions
    Economics
    Morbidity
    Research
    Population

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    Schofield, D., Callander, E., Shrestha, R., Passey, M., Kelly, S., & Percival, R. (2015). Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets. European Journal of Public Health, 25(2), 285-289. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku134
    Schofield, Deborah ; Callander, Emily ; Shrestha, Rupendra ; Passey, Megan ; Kelly, Simon ; Percival, Richard. / Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets. In: European Journal of Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 285-289.
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    abstract = "Background: There has been little research on the economic status of those with multiple health conditions, particularly on the relationship between multiple health conditions and wealth. This paper will assess the difference in the value and type of wealth assets held by Australians who have multiple chronic health conditions. Methods: Using HealthWealthMOD, a microsimulation model of the 45-64-year-old Australian population in 2009, a counterfactual analysis was undertaken. The actual proportion of people with different numbers of chronic health conditions with any wealth, and the value of this wealth was estimated. This was compared with the counterfactual values had the individuals had no chronic health conditions. Results: There was no change in the proportion of people with one health condition who actually had any wealth, compared to the counterfactual proportion had they had no chronic health conditions. Ninety-four percent of those with four or more health conditions had some accumulated wealth; however, under the counterfactual, 100{\%} would have had some accumulated wealth. There was little change in the value of non-income-producing assets under the counterfactual, regardless of number of health conditions. Those with four or more chronic health conditions had a mean value of $17 000 in income-producing assets; under the counterfactual, the average would have been $78 000. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the variation in the value of wealth according to number of chronic health conditions, and hence the importance of considering multiple morbidities when discussing the relationship between health and wealth.",
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    Schofield, D, Callander, E, Shrestha, R, Passey, M, Kelly, S & Percival, R 2015, 'Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets', European Journal of Public Health, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 285-289. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku134

    Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets. / Schofield, Deborah; Callander, Emily; Shrestha, Rupendra; Passey, Megan; Kelly, Simon; Percival, Richard.

    In: European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 25, No. 2, 2015, p. 285-289.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets

    AU - Schofield, Deborah

    AU - Callander, Emily

    AU - Shrestha, Rupendra

    AU - Passey, Megan

    AU - Kelly, Simon

    AU - Percival, Richard

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    N2 - Background: There has been little research on the economic status of those with multiple health conditions, particularly on the relationship between multiple health conditions and wealth. This paper will assess the difference in the value and type of wealth assets held by Australians who have multiple chronic health conditions. Methods: Using HealthWealthMOD, a microsimulation model of the 45-64-year-old Australian population in 2009, a counterfactual analysis was undertaken. The actual proportion of people with different numbers of chronic health conditions with any wealth, and the value of this wealth was estimated. This was compared with the counterfactual values had the individuals had no chronic health conditions. Results: There was no change in the proportion of people with one health condition who actually had any wealth, compared to the counterfactual proportion had they had no chronic health conditions. Ninety-four percent of those with four or more health conditions had some accumulated wealth; however, under the counterfactual, 100% would have had some accumulated wealth. There was little change in the value of non-income-producing assets under the counterfactual, regardless of number of health conditions. Those with four or more chronic health conditions had a mean value of $17 000 in income-producing assets; under the counterfactual, the average would have been $78 000. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the variation in the value of wealth according to number of chronic health conditions, and hence the importance of considering multiple morbidities when discussing the relationship between health and wealth.

    AB - Background: There has been little research on the economic status of those with multiple health conditions, particularly on the relationship between multiple health conditions and wealth. This paper will assess the difference in the value and type of wealth assets held by Australians who have multiple chronic health conditions. Methods: Using HealthWealthMOD, a microsimulation model of the 45-64-year-old Australian population in 2009, a counterfactual analysis was undertaken. The actual proportion of people with different numbers of chronic health conditions with any wealth, and the value of this wealth was estimated. This was compared with the counterfactual values had the individuals had no chronic health conditions. Results: There was no change in the proportion of people with one health condition who actually had any wealth, compared to the counterfactual proportion had they had no chronic health conditions. Ninety-four percent of those with four or more health conditions had some accumulated wealth; however, under the counterfactual, 100% would have had some accumulated wealth. There was little change in the value of non-income-producing assets under the counterfactual, regardless of number of health conditions. Those with four or more chronic health conditions had a mean value of $17 000 in income-producing assets; under the counterfactual, the average would have been $78 000. Conclusion: This study has highlighted the variation in the value of wealth according to number of chronic health conditions, and hence the importance of considering multiple morbidities when discussing the relationship between health and wealth.

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    JF - European Journal of Public Health

    SN - 1101-1262

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    Schofield D, Callander E, Shrestha R, Passey M, Kelly S, Percival R. Multiple chronic health conditions and their link with wealth assets. European Journal of Public Health. 2015;25(2):285-289. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku134