Native bird breeding in a chronosequence of revegetated sites

Katherine Selwood, Ralph MAC NALLY, Jim THOMSON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Restoration of degraded landscapes through replantings of native vegetation has been proceeding in response to habitat loss and fragmentation and plummeting biodiversity. Little is known about whether the investments in ecological restoration have resulted in biodiversity benefits. We evaluated the potential of restored sites to support populations by assessing bird breeding activity. We surveyed 21 revegetated sites of various ages (9–111 years) in the box–ironbark region of Victoria, Australia. Sites differed in landscape context, patch features and in-site characteristics. The latter, including whether sites were grazed, amounts of fallen timber and numbers of remnant trees, were most important in affecting overall bird breeding activity. Patch-configuration (e.g., shape, area) was of secondary importance. Landscape context appeared to have little effect on bird breeding except for one species. While these results suggest that in-site habitat structure is the predominant driver, we caution against dismissing the importance of patch characteristics and landscape context for two reasons. First, the available sites covered a relatively small range of areas (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-446
Number of pages12
JournalOecologia
Volume159
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

chronosequences
chronosequence
birds
breeding
Victoria (Australia)
biodiversity
landscape management
ecological restoration
habitat destruction
habitat fragmentation
habitat structure
habitat loss
timber
vegetation
habitats
breeding bird
restoration

Cite this

Selwood, Katherine ; MAC NALLY, Ralph ; THOMSON, Jim. / Native bird breeding in a chronosequence of revegetated sites. In: Oecologia. 2009 ; Vol. 159. pp. 435-446.
@article{b14eed399d924854a0e59a5c05c7e5a6,
title = "Native bird breeding in a chronosequence of revegetated sites",
abstract = "Restoration of degraded landscapes through replantings of native vegetation has been proceeding in response to habitat loss and fragmentation and plummeting biodiversity. Little is known about whether the investments in ecological restoration have resulted in biodiversity benefits. We evaluated the potential of restored sites to support populations by assessing bird breeding activity. We surveyed 21 revegetated sites of various ages (9–111 years) in the box–ironbark region of Victoria, Australia. Sites differed in landscape context, patch features and in-site characteristics. The latter, including whether sites were grazed, amounts of fallen timber and numbers of remnant trees, were most important in affecting overall bird breeding activity. Patch-configuration (e.g., shape, area) was of secondary importance. Landscape context appeared to have little effect on bird breeding except for one species. While these results suggest that in-site habitat structure is the predominant driver, we caution against dismissing the importance of patch characteristics and landscape context for two reasons. First, the available sites covered a relatively small range of areas (",
keywords = "Box–ironbark forests, Evidence for breeding, Habitat structure, Landscape context, Southeastern Australia.",
author = "Katherine Selwood and {MAC NALLY}, Ralph and Jim THOMSON",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1007/s00442-008-1221-9",
language = "English",
volume = "159",
pages = "435--446",
journal = "Oecologia",
issn = "0029-8549",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

Native bird breeding in a chronosequence of revegetated sites. / Selwood, Katherine; MAC NALLY, Ralph; THOMSON, Jim.

In: Oecologia, Vol. 159, 2009, p. 435-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Native bird breeding in a chronosequence of revegetated sites

AU - Selwood, Katherine

AU - MAC NALLY, Ralph

AU - THOMSON, Jim

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Restoration of degraded landscapes through replantings of native vegetation has been proceeding in response to habitat loss and fragmentation and plummeting biodiversity. Little is known about whether the investments in ecological restoration have resulted in biodiversity benefits. We evaluated the potential of restored sites to support populations by assessing bird breeding activity. We surveyed 21 revegetated sites of various ages (9–111 years) in the box–ironbark region of Victoria, Australia. Sites differed in landscape context, patch features and in-site characteristics. The latter, including whether sites were grazed, amounts of fallen timber and numbers of remnant trees, were most important in affecting overall bird breeding activity. Patch-configuration (e.g., shape, area) was of secondary importance. Landscape context appeared to have little effect on bird breeding except for one species. While these results suggest that in-site habitat structure is the predominant driver, we caution against dismissing the importance of patch characteristics and landscape context for two reasons. First, the available sites covered a relatively small range of areas (

AB - Restoration of degraded landscapes through replantings of native vegetation has been proceeding in response to habitat loss and fragmentation and plummeting biodiversity. Little is known about whether the investments in ecological restoration have resulted in biodiversity benefits. We evaluated the potential of restored sites to support populations by assessing bird breeding activity. We surveyed 21 revegetated sites of various ages (9–111 years) in the box–ironbark region of Victoria, Australia. Sites differed in landscape context, patch features and in-site characteristics. The latter, including whether sites were grazed, amounts of fallen timber and numbers of remnant trees, were most important in affecting overall bird breeding activity. Patch-configuration (e.g., shape, area) was of secondary importance. Landscape context appeared to have little effect on bird breeding except for one species. While these results suggest that in-site habitat structure is the predominant driver, we caution against dismissing the importance of patch characteristics and landscape context for two reasons. First, the available sites covered a relatively small range of areas (

KW - Box–ironbark forests

KW - Evidence for breeding

KW - Habitat structure

KW - Landscape context

KW - Southeastern Australia.

U2 - 10.1007/s00442-008-1221-9

DO - 10.1007/s00442-008-1221-9

M3 - Article

VL - 159

SP - 435

EP - 446

JO - Oecologia

JF - Oecologia

SN - 0029-8549

ER -