Nature Connectedness in the Climate Change Context: Implications for Climate Action and Mental Health

Sonia L. Curll, Samantha K. Stanley, Patricia M. Brown, Léan V. O’Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A sense of psychological connectedness with the natural world has important benefits for global health. In a time of environmental crisis, however, it may also be accompanied by mental health risks. We used national survey data collected after a severe Australian bushfire season (N = 3,875) to test a path model of the relationships between nature connectedness, worry about climate change, individual and collective climate action, and psychological distress (depression, anxiety, stress). We found that nature connectedness was positively associated with climate worry that, in turn, was positively associated with climate action and psychological distress. Whereas taking individual climate action was associated with reduced psychological distress, taking collective climate action had the opposite effect. Our findings provide new insights into potential processes underlying the association between nature connectedness and mental health in the climate change context and point to an urgent need to protect the well-being of people engaging in collective climate action

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalTranslational Issues in Psychological Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

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