Neuromuscular Fatigue and Muscle Damage After a Women's Rugby Sevens Tournament

Anthea C Clarke, Judith M Anson, David B Pyne

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: To examine relationships between on-field game movement patterns and changes in markers of neuromuscular fatigue and muscle damage during a 2-d women's rugby sevens tournament.

    METHODS: Female national (mean ± SD n = 12, 22.3 ± 2.5 y, 1.67 ± 0.04 m, 65.8 ± 4.6 kg) and state (n = 10, 24.4 ± 4.3 y, 1.67 ± 0.03 m, 66.1 ± 7.9 kg) representative players completed baseline testing for lower-body neuromuscular function (countermovement-jump [CMJ] test), muscle damage (capillary creatine kinase [CK]), perceived soreness, and perceived recovery. Testing was repeated after games on days 1 and 2 of the tournament. GPS (5-Hz) data were collected throughout the tournament (4-6 games/player).

    RESULTS: National players were involved in greater on-field movements for total time, distance, high-speed running (>5 m/s), and impacts >10 g (effect size [ES] = 0.55-0.97) and displayed a smaller decrement in performance from day 1 to day 2. Despite this, state players had a much greater 4-fold increase (δCK = 737 U/L) in CK compared with the 2-fold increase (δCK = 502 U/L) in national players (ES = 0.73). Both groups had similar perceived soreness and recovery while CMJ performance was unchanged. High-speed running and impacts >10 g were largely correlated (r = .66-.91) with δCK for both groups.

    CONCLUSION: A 2-day women's rugby sevens tournament elicits substantial muscle damage; however, there was little change in lower-body neuromuscular function. Modest increases in CK can largely be attributed to high-speed running and impacts >10 g that players typically endure.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)808-814
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
    Volume10
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Muscle Fatigue
    Football
    Creatine Kinase
    Running
    Muscles
    varespladib methyl

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    title = "Neuromuscular Fatigue and Muscle Damage After a Women's Rugby Sevens Tournament",
    abstract = "PURPOSE: To examine relationships between on-field game movement patterns and changes in markers of neuromuscular fatigue and muscle damage during a 2-d women's rugby sevens tournament.METHODS: Female national (mean ± SD n = 12, 22.3 ± 2.5 y, 1.67 ± 0.04 m, 65.8 ± 4.6 kg) and state (n = 10, 24.4 ± 4.3 y, 1.67 ± 0.03 m, 66.1 ± 7.9 kg) representative players completed baseline testing for lower-body neuromuscular function (countermovement-jump [CMJ] test), muscle damage (capillary creatine kinase [CK]), perceived soreness, and perceived recovery. Testing was repeated after games on days 1 and 2 of the tournament. GPS (5-Hz) data were collected throughout the tournament (4-6 games/player).RESULTS: National players were involved in greater on-field movements for total time, distance, high-speed running (>5 m/s), and impacts >10 g (effect size [ES] = 0.55-0.97) and displayed a smaller decrement in performance from day 1 to day 2. Despite this, state players had a much greater 4-fold increase (δCK = 737 U/L) in CK compared with the 2-fold increase (δCK = 502 U/L) in national players (ES = 0.73). Both groups had similar perceived soreness and recovery while CMJ performance was unchanged. High-speed running and impacts >10 g were largely correlated (r = .66-.91) with δCK for both groups.CONCLUSION: A 2-day women's rugby sevens tournament elicits substantial muscle damage; however, there was little change in lower-body neuromuscular function. Modest increases in CK can largely be attributed to high-speed running and impacts >10 g that players typically endure.",
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    Neuromuscular Fatigue and Muscle Damage After a Women's Rugby Sevens Tournament. / Clarke, Anthea C; Anson, Judith M; Pyne, David B.

    In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 10, No. 6, 2015, p. 808-814.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Neuromuscular Fatigue and Muscle Damage After a Women's Rugby Sevens Tournament

    AU - Clarke, Anthea C

    AU - Anson, Judith M

    AU - Pyne, David B

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - PURPOSE: To examine relationships between on-field game movement patterns and changes in markers of neuromuscular fatigue and muscle damage during a 2-d women's rugby sevens tournament.METHODS: Female national (mean ± SD n = 12, 22.3 ± 2.5 y, 1.67 ± 0.04 m, 65.8 ± 4.6 kg) and state (n = 10, 24.4 ± 4.3 y, 1.67 ± 0.03 m, 66.1 ± 7.9 kg) representative players completed baseline testing for lower-body neuromuscular function (countermovement-jump [CMJ] test), muscle damage (capillary creatine kinase [CK]), perceived soreness, and perceived recovery. Testing was repeated after games on days 1 and 2 of the tournament. GPS (5-Hz) data were collected throughout the tournament (4-6 games/player).RESULTS: National players were involved in greater on-field movements for total time, distance, high-speed running (>5 m/s), and impacts >10 g (effect size [ES] = 0.55-0.97) and displayed a smaller decrement in performance from day 1 to day 2. Despite this, state players had a much greater 4-fold increase (δCK = 737 U/L) in CK compared with the 2-fold increase (δCK = 502 U/L) in national players (ES = 0.73). Both groups had similar perceived soreness and recovery while CMJ performance was unchanged. High-speed running and impacts >10 g were largely correlated (r = .66-.91) with δCK for both groups.CONCLUSION: A 2-day women's rugby sevens tournament elicits substantial muscle damage; however, there was little change in lower-body neuromuscular function. Modest increases in CK can largely be attributed to high-speed running and impacts >10 g that players typically endure.

    AB - PURPOSE: To examine relationships between on-field game movement patterns and changes in markers of neuromuscular fatigue and muscle damage during a 2-d women's rugby sevens tournament.METHODS: Female national (mean ± SD n = 12, 22.3 ± 2.5 y, 1.67 ± 0.04 m, 65.8 ± 4.6 kg) and state (n = 10, 24.4 ± 4.3 y, 1.67 ± 0.03 m, 66.1 ± 7.9 kg) representative players completed baseline testing for lower-body neuromuscular function (countermovement-jump [CMJ] test), muscle damage (capillary creatine kinase [CK]), perceived soreness, and perceived recovery. Testing was repeated after games on days 1 and 2 of the tournament. GPS (5-Hz) data were collected throughout the tournament (4-6 games/player).RESULTS: National players were involved in greater on-field movements for total time, distance, high-speed running (>5 m/s), and impacts >10 g (effect size [ES] = 0.55-0.97) and displayed a smaller decrement in performance from day 1 to day 2. Despite this, state players had a much greater 4-fold increase (δCK = 737 U/L) in CK compared with the 2-fold increase (δCK = 502 U/L) in national players (ES = 0.73). Both groups had similar perceived soreness and recovery while CMJ performance was unchanged. High-speed running and impacts >10 g were largely correlated (r = .66-.91) with δCK for both groups.CONCLUSION: A 2-day women's rugby sevens tournament elicits substantial muscle damage; however, there was little change in lower-body neuromuscular function. Modest increases in CK can largely be attributed to high-speed running and impacts >10 g that players typically endure.

    KW - Acceleration

    KW - Adult

    KW - Athletes

    KW - Athletic Performance

    KW - Biomechanical Phenomena

    KW - Competitive Behavior

    KW - Female

    KW - Football

    KW - Humans

    KW - Motor Activity

    KW - Muscle Fatigue

    KW - Muscle Strength

    KW - Muscle, Skeletal

    KW - Myalgia

    KW - Pain Measurement

    KW - Perception

    KW - Physical Endurance

    KW - Recovery of Function

    KW - Running

    KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

    KW - Task Performance and Analysis

    KW - Time Factors

    KW - Young Adult

    KW - Comparative Study

    KW - Journal Article

    KW - Observational Study

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    JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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