New life for old bones: moving image collections at the National Archives of Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cinema studies scholarship has recently turned its attention to the ‘utilitarian film’; the industrial, training and ‘data-film’; Rick Prelinger’s ‘vernacular archive’. An Australian study mapping this territory has been initiated. Australia’s largest repository of audio-visual records is the National Archives of Australia (NAA), where a variety of collections derived from Commonwealth agencies (CAs) are housed and preserved. Diminishing resources allocated by governments to collecting institutions in Australia compound the degree of difficulty faced by moving image archives at a time when an exponential growth in digital acquisitions, crisis around the preservation of video-originated archives and citizen’s needs and expectations of access to records, including moving image archives, increases. This article offers an overview of the NAA’s Audio-visual Preservation projects and collections.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-272
Number of pages21
JournalStudies in Documentary Film
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Bone
access to records
cinema
video
acquisition
National Archives
citizen
resources

Cite this

@article{27303f5aca6b463a96df4edc3340d80e,
title = "New life for old bones: moving image collections at the National Archives of Australia",
abstract = "Cinema studies scholarship has recently turned its attention to the ‘utilitarian film’; the industrial, training and ‘data-film’; Rick Prelinger’s ‘vernacular archive’. An Australian study mapping this territory has been initiated. Australia’s largest repository of audio-visual records is the National Archives of Australia (NAA), where a variety of collections derived from Commonwealth agencies (CAs) are housed and preserved. Diminishing resources allocated by governments to collecting institutions in Australia compound the degree of difficulty faced by moving image archives at a time when an exponential growth in digital acquisitions, crisis around the preservation of video-originated archives and citizen’s needs and expectations of access to records, including moving image archives, increases. This article offers an overview of the NAA’s Audio-visual Preservation projects and collections.",
keywords = "audio-visual archives, Australian documentary, National Archives of Australia, utility film",
author = "John HUGHES",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/17503280.2016.1249046",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "252--272",
journal = "Studies in Documentary Film",
issn = "1750-3280",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

New life for old bones: moving image collections at the National Archives of Australia. / HUGHES, John.

In: Studies in Documentary Film, Vol. 10, No. 3, 2016, p. 252-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - New life for old bones: moving image collections at the National Archives of Australia

AU - HUGHES, John

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Cinema studies scholarship has recently turned its attention to the ‘utilitarian film’; the industrial, training and ‘data-film’; Rick Prelinger’s ‘vernacular archive’. An Australian study mapping this territory has been initiated. Australia’s largest repository of audio-visual records is the National Archives of Australia (NAA), where a variety of collections derived from Commonwealth agencies (CAs) are housed and preserved. Diminishing resources allocated by governments to collecting institutions in Australia compound the degree of difficulty faced by moving image archives at a time when an exponential growth in digital acquisitions, crisis around the preservation of video-originated archives and citizen’s needs and expectations of access to records, including moving image archives, increases. This article offers an overview of the NAA’s Audio-visual Preservation projects and collections.

AB - Cinema studies scholarship has recently turned its attention to the ‘utilitarian film’; the industrial, training and ‘data-film’; Rick Prelinger’s ‘vernacular archive’. An Australian study mapping this territory has been initiated. Australia’s largest repository of audio-visual records is the National Archives of Australia (NAA), where a variety of collections derived from Commonwealth agencies (CAs) are housed and preserved. Diminishing resources allocated by governments to collecting institutions in Australia compound the degree of difficulty faced by moving image archives at a time when an exponential growth in digital acquisitions, crisis around the preservation of video-originated archives and citizen’s needs and expectations of access to records, including moving image archives, increases. This article offers an overview of the NAA’s Audio-visual Preservation projects and collections.

KW - audio-visual archives

KW - Australian documentary

KW - National Archives of Australia

KW - utility film

U2 - 10.1080/17503280.2016.1249046

DO - 10.1080/17503280.2016.1249046

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 252

EP - 272

JO - Studies in Documentary Film

JF - Studies in Documentary Film

SN - 1750-3280

IS - 3

ER -