No Burnout at this Coal-Face: Managing Occupational Stress in Forensic Personnel and the Implications for Forensic and Criminal Justice Agencies

Dr Sally Kelty, Heidi Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Working as a police officer, psychiatric intern, crime scene expert or forensic physician can be stressful and these occupations have high burnout rates. Almost 20% of police officers and other justice-related emergency management personnel develop heightened occupational stress. In some Australian law-enforcement agencies, attrition rates of close to 50% over 3 years have been reported for forensic practitioners and crime scene examiners (CSEs). Included in these rates are a large number of CSEs who report long-term psychological injury due to their exposure to serious crime scenes. We interviewed 19 CSEs designated by their workplaces as performing at a high level to determine how they manage this stressful occupational. The CSEs were aware of the potential stress of their occupation and actively engaged in self stress-management strategies. In this article, we overview the results with attention given to why forensic organizations should invest in promoting stress-management strategies in their employees
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-290
Number of pages18
JournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Law
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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occupational stress
Criminal Law
Coal
burnout
Crime
coal
personnel
justice
examiner
offense
stress management
Police
police officer
Occupations
occupation
Personnel Management
personnel management
Law Enforcement
Social Justice
Self Care

Cite this

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