No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration

V Bellan, SB Wallwork, TR Stanton, C Reverberi, A Gallace, GL Moseley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one's own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both 'upward-downward' and 'towards-away from the elbow' planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a 'telescoping' effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0157351
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Telescopes
Tendons
tendons
Vibration
vibration
Arm
elbows
Elbow
limbs (animal)
Extremities
Human Body
shrinkage
joints (animal)
agonists
antagonists
hands
Hand
Joints
Experiments
Research

Cite this

Bellan, V., Wallwork, SB., Stanton, TR., Reverberi, C., Gallace, A., & Moseley, GL. (2016). No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration. PLoS One, 11(6), 1-19. [e0157351]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157351
Bellan, V ; Wallwork, SB ; Stanton, TR ; Reverberi, C ; Gallace, A ; Moseley, GL. / No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 1-19.
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Bellan, V, Wallwork, SB, Stanton, TR, Reverberi, C, Gallace, A & Moseley, GL 2016, 'No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 6, e0157351, pp. 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157351

No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration. / Bellan, V; Wallwork, SB; Stanton, TR; Reverberi, C; Gallace, A; Moseley, GL.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 6, e0157351, 15.06.2016, p. 1-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Bellan V, Wallwork SB, Stanton TR, Reverberi C, Gallace A, Moseley GL. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration. PLoS One. 2016 Jun 15;11(6):1-19. e0157351. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157351