Nursing is Battered and bruised

But now is the time to fight back

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

It has often been said that nursing andnurse education is undergoing a period of
intense change. However, change has never been so intense and multifaceted as it is today. And questions have been raised about how nurses are educated and the academic level required to be a ‘good nurse’. Nursing is wounded, it is bruised and battered, taking hits from many sources. Since the well-reported failings in care at Mid Staffordshire, which, although horrific, did not solely lie at the feet of a single profession, the quest to ‘fix’ nursing has gained momentum and, with it, nurse education and nursing roles have come under intense scrutiny. Much attention has been given to the already well-rehearsed row over whether nurses need a degree-level education to be a ‘good nurse’. It is a problem when your professional identity is also a verb for an activity that can be undertaken by others not on the professional nursing register.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406-407
Number of pages2
JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Cite this

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title = "Nursing is Battered and bruised: But now is the time to fight back",
abstract = "It has often been said that nursing andnurse education is undergoing a period ofintense change. However, change has never been so intense and multifaceted as it is today. And questions have been raised about how nurses are educated and the academic level required to be a ‘good nurse’. Nursing is wounded, it is bruised and battered, taking hits from many sources. Since the well-reported failings in care at Mid Staffordshire, which, although horrific, did not solely lie at the feet of a single profession, the quest to ‘fix’ nursing has gained momentum and, with it, nurse education and nursing roles have come under intense scrutiny. Much attention has been given to the already well-rehearsed row over whether nurses need a degree-level education to be a ‘good nurse’. It is a problem when your professional identity is also a verb for an activity that can be undertaken by others not on the professional nursing register.",
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Nursing is Battered and bruised : But now is the time to fight back. / STRICKLAND, Karen.

In: British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 7, 2018, p. 406-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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