Occurrence and abundance of monosulfidic black ooze in coastal acid sulfate soil landscapes

Richard T. Bush, Diane Fyfe, Leigh A. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organic oozes enriched in iron monosulfides are called monosulfidic black ooze (MBO). The occurrence and abundance of MBO were quantified in natural tributaries and man-made drainage canals on a typical coastal river floodplain. Thick deposits of MBO occurred in drains and the protected upper reaches of tributaries in acid sulfate soil (ASS) areas. Acid-tolerant lilies grew prolifically in these areas, contributing large amounts of decaying organic debris. The MBO contained up to 6.3% acid-volatile sulfur (equivalent to 18% iron monosulfide), an order of magnitude greater than reported previously for natural sediments. It also contained up to 6% pyritic sulfur (equivalent to approximately 11% pyrite). Sulfate and iron from surrounding ASS combined with abundant organic matter and protected flow in ASS drains provide excellent conditions for sulfate reduction, leading to iron sulfide precipitation and the accumulation of organic detritus. When mixed with water, the iron monosulfide in MBO can react within minutes to completely consume dissolved oxygen. There are thousands of drains in ASS areas that may have thick deposits of MBO. The MBO has the potential to cause rapid and severe effects on water quality. The challenge is to develop management practices that reduce the formation and accumulation of MBO in acid sulfate landscapes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-616
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Journal of Soil Research
Volume42
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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acid sulfate soils
acid sulfate soil
ooze
iron
sulfates
drain
acids
sulfur
sulfate
drainage channels
Lilium
tributary
acid
sulfides
floodplains
dissolved oxygen
water quality
organic matter
iron sulfide
sediments

Cite this

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abstract = "Organic oozes enriched in iron monosulfides are called monosulfidic black ooze (MBO). The occurrence and abundance of MBO were quantified in natural tributaries and man-made drainage canals on a typical coastal river floodplain. Thick deposits of MBO occurred in drains and the protected upper reaches of tributaries in acid sulfate soil (ASS) areas. Acid-tolerant lilies grew prolifically in these areas, contributing large amounts of decaying organic debris. The MBO contained up to 6.3{\%} acid-volatile sulfur (equivalent to 18{\%} iron monosulfide), an order of magnitude greater than reported previously for natural sediments. It also contained up to 6{\%} pyritic sulfur (equivalent to approximately 11{\%} pyrite). Sulfate and iron from surrounding ASS combined with abundant organic matter and protected flow in ASS drains provide excellent conditions for sulfate reduction, leading to iron sulfide precipitation and the accumulation of organic detritus. When mixed with water, the iron monosulfide in MBO can react within minutes to completely consume dissolved oxygen. There are thousands of drains in ASS areas that may have thick deposits of MBO. The MBO has the potential to cause rapid and severe effects on water quality. The challenge is to develop management practices that reduce the formation and accumulation of MBO in acid sulfate landscapes.",
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Occurrence and abundance of monosulfidic black ooze in coastal acid sulfate soil landscapes. / Bush, Richard T.; Fyfe, Diane; Sullivan, Leigh A.

In: Australian Journal of Soil Research, Vol. 42, No. 5-6, 2004, p. 609-616.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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