Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence

The ATTICA study

Georgia Maria Kouli, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Ioannis Kyrou, Emanuela Magriplis, Ekavi N. Georgousopoulou, Christina Chrysohoou, Constantine Tsigos, Dimitrios Tousoulis, Christos Pitsavos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Olive oil, being rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids and anti-inflammatory compounds, may have protective effects against cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the present work was to examine the association of olive oil consumption with the 10-year CVD incidence in adults without pre-existing CVD. Methods: The ATTICA Study is a prospective, population-based study conducted in the greater metropolitan area of Athens (Attica, Greece). During 2001–2002, 3042 CVD-free adults (1514 men and 1528 women) were voluntarily recruited to the ATTICA study. Among various dietary habits, consumption of olive oil and other fats/oils was assessed at baseline; participants were classified into three groups (no use; mixed use; and exclusive use of olive oil). In 2011–2012, the 10-year study follow-up was performed, recording the fatal/non-fatal CVD incidence in 2020 participants (mean follow-up duration: 8.41 years). Results: After controlling for various covariates, an inverse association between exclusive olive oil use and the risk of developing CVD was observed (relative risk 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01–0.66) compared to those not consuming olive oil. Further adjustment for fibrinogen plasma levels (among various inflammatory markers) showed a significant mediation effect on the previous association. Conclusions: These findings support exclusive olive oil consumption, a key component of the Mediterranean diet, for the primary CVD prevention, in adults without pre-existing disease. Circulating fibrinogen levels appear to play a mediating role in this relationship.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-138
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Cardiovascular Diseases
Incidence
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Fibrinogen
Mediterranean Diet
Greece
Feeding Behavior
Olive Oil
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Oils
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Fats
Population

Cite this

Kouli, G. M., Panagiotakos, D. B., Kyrou, I., Magriplis, E., Georgousopoulou, E. N., Chrysohoou, C., ... Pitsavos, C. (2019). Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: The ATTICA study. European Journal of Nutrition, 58(1), 131-138. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1577-x
Kouli, Georgia Maria ; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B. ; Kyrou, Ioannis ; Magriplis, Emanuela ; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N. ; Chrysohoou, Christina ; Tsigos, Constantine ; Tousoulis, Dimitrios ; Pitsavos, Christos. / Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence : The ATTICA study. In: European Journal of Nutrition. 2019 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 131-138.
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abstract = "Purpose: Olive oil, being rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids and anti-inflammatory compounds, may have protective effects against cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the present work was to examine the association of olive oil consumption with the 10-year CVD incidence in adults without pre-existing CVD. Methods: The ATTICA Study is a prospective, population-based study conducted in the greater metropolitan area of Athens (Attica, Greece). During 2001–2002, 3042 CVD-free adults (1514 men and 1528 women) were voluntarily recruited to the ATTICA study. Among various dietary habits, consumption of olive oil and other fats/oils was assessed at baseline; participants were classified into three groups (no use; mixed use; and exclusive use of olive oil). In 2011–2012, the 10-year study follow-up was performed, recording the fatal/non-fatal CVD incidence in 2020 participants (mean follow-up duration: 8.41 years). Results: After controlling for various covariates, an inverse association between exclusive olive oil use and the risk of developing CVD was observed (relative risk 0.07, 95{\%} CI: 0.01–0.66) compared to those not consuming olive oil. Further adjustment for fibrinogen plasma levels (among various inflammatory markers) showed a significant mediation effect on the previous association. Conclusions: These findings support exclusive olive oil consumption, a key component of the Mediterranean diet, for the primary CVD prevention, in adults without pre-existing disease. Circulating fibrinogen levels appear to play a mediating role in this relationship.",
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Kouli, GM, Panagiotakos, DB, Kyrou, I, Magriplis, E, Georgousopoulou, EN, Chrysohoou, C, Tsigos, C, Tousoulis, D & Pitsavos, C 2019, 'Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: The ATTICA study', European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 131-138. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1577-x

Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence : The ATTICA study. / Kouli, Georgia Maria; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Kyrou, Ioannis; Magriplis, Emanuela; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N.; Chrysohoou, Christina; Tsigos, Constantine; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Pitsavos, Christos.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 58, No. 1, 02.2019, p. 131-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence

T2 - The ATTICA study

AU - Kouli, Georgia Maria

AU - Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.

AU - Kyrou, Ioannis

AU - Magriplis, Emanuela

AU - Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N.

AU - Chrysohoou, Christina

AU - Tsigos, Constantine

AU - Tousoulis, Dimitrios

AU - Pitsavos, Christos

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - Purpose: Olive oil, being rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids and anti-inflammatory compounds, may have protective effects against cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the present work was to examine the association of olive oil consumption with the 10-year CVD incidence in adults without pre-existing CVD. Methods: The ATTICA Study is a prospective, population-based study conducted in the greater metropolitan area of Athens (Attica, Greece). During 2001–2002, 3042 CVD-free adults (1514 men and 1528 women) were voluntarily recruited to the ATTICA study. Among various dietary habits, consumption of olive oil and other fats/oils was assessed at baseline; participants were classified into three groups (no use; mixed use; and exclusive use of olive oil). In 2011–2012, the 10-year study follow-up was performed, recording the fatal/non-fatal CVD incidence in 2020 participants (mean follow-up duration: 8.41 years). Results: After controlling for various covariates, an inverse association between exclusive olive oil use and the risk of developing CVD was observed (relative risk 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01–0.66) compared to those not consuming olive oil. Further adjustment for fibrinogen plasma levels (among various inflammatory markers) showed a significant mediation effect on the previous association. Conclusions: These findings support exclusive olive oil consumption, a key component of the Mediterranean diet, for the primary CVD prevention, in adults without pre-existing disease. Circulating fibrinogen levels appear to play a mediating role in this relationship.

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KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Fibrinogen

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Kouli GM, Panagiotakos DB, Kyrou I, Magriplis E, Georgousopoulou EN, Chrysohoou C et al. Olive oil consumption and 10-year (2002–2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: The ATTICA study. European Journal of Nutrition. 2019 Feb;58(1):131-138. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1577-x