On the role of discipline-related self-concept in deep and surface approaches to learning among university students

Michael J. Platow, Kenneth I. Mavor, Diana GRACE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current research examined the role that students' discipline-related self-concepts may play in their deep and surface approaches to learning, their overall learning outcomes, and continued engagement in the discipline itself. Using a cross-lagged panel design of first-year university psychology students, a causal path was observed in which students' Semester 1 deep approach to learning positively predicted their Semester 2 psychology-student social identification; this relationship was mediated by students' actual Semester 1 learning. Moreover, relatively high levels of Semester 2 psychology-student social identification led to a desire for further engagement in the discipline through an enhanced intent to continue their psychology studies. In contrast, discipline-related self-concept was not observed to act as a precursor to learning approaches. Overall, the current data provide clear evidence not only for the validity of the deep learning approach construct, but for the theoretical claims associating a deep learning approach with an impact on self-concept, and the educational value of encouraging a deep learning approach both for short-term academic performance and for continuing motivation to engage in the discipline
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-285
Number of pages15
JournalInstructional Science
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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self-concept
Self Concept
Learning
Students
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psychology student
learning
semester
student
Psychology
Social Identification
psychology studies
Motivation
Research
performance
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Platow, Michael J. ; Mavor, Kenneth I. ; GRACE, Diana. / On the role of discipline-related self-concept in deep and surface approaches to learning among university students. In: Instructional Science. 2013 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 271-285.
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On the role of discipline-related self-concept in deep and surface approaches to learning among university students. / Platow, Michael J.; Mavor, Kenneth I.; GRACE, Diana.

In: Instructional Science, Vol. 41, No. 2, 2013, p. 271-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Mavor, Kenneth I.

AU - GRACE, Diana

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AB - The current research examined the role that students' discipline-related self-concepts may play in their deep and surface approaches to learning, their overall learning outcomes, and continued engagement in the discipline itself. Using a cross-lagged panel design of first-year university psychology students, a causal path was observed in which students' Semester 1 deep approach to learning positively predicted their Semester 2 psychology-student social identification; this relationship was mediated by students' actual Semester 1 learning. Moreover, relatively high levels of Semester 2 psychology-student social identification led to a desire for further engagement in the discipline through an enhanced intent to continue their psychology studies. In contrast, discipline-related self-concept was not observed to act as a precursor to learning approaches. Overall, the current data provide clear evidence not only for the validity of the deep learning approach construct, but for the theoretical claims associating a deep learning approach with an impact on self-concept, and the educational value of encouraging a deep learning approach both for short-term academic performance and for continuing motivation to engage in the discipline

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