Optimal management of a forested catchment providing timber and carbon sequestration benefits: Climate change effects

Daniel A. Spring, John O S Kennedy, R. Mac Nally

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Climate change is predicted to increase fire frequency and exacerbate water scarcity. The effect of these changes on the tree harvest decision in a forested catchment is investigated using stochastic dynamic programming, taking a stand of mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) in south–eastern Australia as a case study. We find that for a range of water and carbon sequestration values, it is optimal to cease harvesting in the absence of climate change. Whether it is optimal to do so under climate change will depend on the magnitude of the increases in fire frequency and water value. Potential increases in forest productivity also have a significant impact on the tree harvest decision.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)281-292
    Number of pages12
    JournalGlobal Environmental Change
    Volume15
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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    forested catchment
    carbon sequestration
    timber
    climate change
    water
    management
    ash
    programming
    productivity
    mountain
    effect
    Values
    decision
    harvest

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Climate change is predicted to increase fire frequency and exacerbate water scarcity. The effect of these changes on the tree harvest decision in a forested catchment is investigated using stochastic dynamic programming, taking a stand of mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) in south–eastern Australia as a case study. We find that for a range of water and carbon sequestration values, it is optimal to cease harvesting in the absence of climate change. Whether it is optimal to do so under climate change will depend on the magnitude of the increases in fire frequency and water value. Potential increases in forest productivity also have a significant impact on the tree harvest decision.",
    author = "Spring, {Daniel A.} and Kennedy, {John O S} and {Mac Nally}, R.",
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    Optimal management of a forested catchment providing timber and carbon sequestration benefits: Climate change effects. / Spring, Daniel A.; Kennedy, John O S; Mac Nally, R.

    In: Global Environmental Change, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2005, p. 281-292.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AB - Climate change is predicted to increase fire frequency and exacerbate water scarcity. The effect of these changes on the tree harvest decision in a forested catchment is investigated using stochastic dynamic programming, taking a stand of mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) in south–eastern Australia as a case study. We find that for a range of water and carbon sequestration values, it is optimal to cease harvesting in the absence of climate change. Whether it is optimal to do so under climate change will depend on the magnitude of the increases in fire frequency and water value. Potential increases in forest productivity also have a significant impact on the tree harvest decision.

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