Pain, not structural impairments may explain activity limitations in people with gluteal tendinopathy or hip osteoarthritis

A cross sectional study

Angie FEARON, Teresa Neeman, Paul Smith, Jennie SCARVELL, Jill Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Question What are the functional differences between people with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GT), hip osteoarthritis (OA) or an asymptomatic population as measured by walking, Time Up and Go, single leg standing and strength? Design Cross sectional study with blinded measurers. Participants 38 participants with GT, 20 with end stage hip OA and 21 asymptomatic healthy control (AS) participants. All participants were women. Outcome measures Pain (numeric rating scale), Walking speed (m/s), cadence (steps/min) and step length (m) measured via the 10 m walk test and the Timed Up and Go; balance via single leg stance (s) duration; and hip abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation strength, standardized to body mass (BM) via the body mass average index (BMavg), measured via a wall mounted dynamometer. Results The two symptomatic groups reported similar pain levels (p = 0.226), more pain then the AS group (p <0.000). Compared to the AS participants, participants with GT or hip OA demonstrated lower walking speed (10mwt and TUG, p <0.001), lower cadence and shorter duration single leg stance on the affected leg (p <0.05). Participants with GT or hip OA also demonstrated bilaterally weaker hip abduction than the AS group (p = 0.005). Compared to AS and GT participants, participants with hip OA demonstrated adduction weakness on the affected side (p = 0.008 and p = 0.002 respectively). Conclusion There is a significant level of dysfunction and impairments associated with GT and hip OA. As activity limitations do not appear to be differentiated by structural impairments, we suggest that pain, rather than the underlying pathology may be the driving impairment that leads to walking and single leg standing dysfunction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalGait and Posture
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Tendinopathy
Hip Osteoarthritis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Leg
Pain
Walking
Hip
Body Mass Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pathology
Population

Cite this

@article{21c3f286d72746b8acf6e960d1778744,
title = "Pain, not structural impairments may explain activity limitations in people with gluteal tendinopathy or hip osteoarthritis: A cross sectional study",
abstract = "Question What are the functional differences between people with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GT), hip osteoarthritis (OA) or an asymptomatic population as measured by walking, Time Up and Go, single leg standing and strength? Design Cross sectional study with blinded measurers. Participants 38 participants with GT, 20 with end stage hip OA and 21 asymptomatic healthy control (AS) participants. All participants were women. Outcome measures Pain (numeric rating scale), Walking speed (m/s), cadence (steps/min) and step length (m) measured via the 10 m walk test and the Timed Up and Go; balance via single leg stance (s) duration; and hip abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation strength, standardized to body mass (BM) via the body mass average index (BMavg), measured via a wall mounted dynamometer. Results The two symptomatic groups reported similar pain levels (p = 0.226), more pain then the AS group (p <0.000). Compared to the AS participants, participants with GT or hip OA demonstrated lower walking speed (10mwt and TUG, p <0.001), lower cadence and shorter duration single leg stance on the affected leg (p <0.05). Participants with GT or hip OA also demonstrated bilaterally weaker hip abduction than the AS group (p = 0.005). Compared to AS and GT participants, participants with hip OA demonstrated adduction weakness on the affected side (p = 0.008 and p = 0.002 respectively). Conclusion There is a significant level of dysfunction and impairments associated with GT and hip OA. As activity limitations do not appear to be differentiated by structural impairments, we suggest that pain, rather than the underlying pathology may be the driving impairment that leads to walking and single leg standing dysfunction.",
keywords = "Bursitis, GTPS, Gluteal tendinopathy, Hip osteoarthritis, Hip pain, Trendelenburg, Walking",
author = "Angie FEARON and Teresa Neeman and Paul Smith and Jennie SCARVELL and Jill Cook",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.12.005",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "237--243",
journal = "Gait Posture",
issn = "0966-6362",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pain, not structural impairments may explain activity limitations in people with gluteal tendinopathy or hip osteoarthritis

T2 - A cross sectional study

AU - FEARON, Angie

AU - Neeman, Teresa

AU - Smith, Paul

AU - SCARVELL, Jennie

AU - Cook, Jill

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Question What are the functional differences between people with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GT), hip osteoarthritis (OA) or an asymptomatic population as measured by walking, Time Up and Go, single leg standing and strength? Design Cross sectional study with blinded measurers. Participants 38 participants with GT, 20 with end stage hip OA and 21 asymptomatic healthy control (AS) participants. All participants were women. Outcome measures Pain (numeric rating scale), Walking speed (m/s), cadence (steps/min) and step length (m) measured via the 10 m walk test and the Timed Up and Go; balance via single leg stance (s) duration; and hip abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation strength, standardized to body mass (BM) via the body mass average index (BMavg), measured via a wall mounted dynamometer. Results The two symptomatic groups reported similar pain levels (p = 0.226), more pain then the AS group (p <0.000). Compared to the AS participants, participants with GT or hip OA demonstrated lower walking speed (10mwt and TUG, p <0.001), lower cadence and shorter duration single leg stance on the affected leg (p <0.05). Participants with GT or hip OA also demonstrated bilaterally weaker hip abduction than the AS group (p = 0.005). Compared to AS and GT participants, participants with hip OA demonstrated adduction weakness on the affected side (p = 0.008 and p = 0.002 respectively). Conclusion There is a significant level of dysfunction and impairments associated with GT and hip OA. As activity limitations do not appear to be differentiated by structural impairments, we suggest that pain, rather than the underlying pathology may be the driving impairment that leads to walking and single leg standing dysfunction.

AB - Question What are the functional differences between people with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GT), hip osteoarthritis (OA) or an asymptomatic population as measured by walking, Time Up and Go, single leg standing and strength? Design Cross sectional study with blinded measurers. Participants 38 participants with GT, 20 with end stage hip OA and 21 asymptomatic healthy control (AS) participants. All participants were women. Outcome measures Pain (numeric rating scale), Walking speed (m/s), cadence (steps/min) and step length (m) measured via the 10 m walk test and the Timed Up and Go; balance via single leg stance (s) duration; and hip abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation strength, standardized to body mass (BM) via the body mass average index (BMavg), measured via a wall mounted dynamometer. Results The two symptomatic groups reported similar pain levels (p = 0.226), more pain then the AS group (p <0.000). Compared to the AS participants, participants with GT or hip OA demonstrated lower walking speed (10mwt and TUG, p <0.001), lower cadence and shorter duration single leg stance on the affected leg (p <0.05). Participants with GT or hip OA also demonstrated bilaterally weaker hip abduction than the AS group (p = 0.005). Compared to AS and GT participants, participants with hip OA demonstrated adduction weakness on the affected side (p = 0.008 and p = 0.002 respectively). Conclusion There is a significant level of dysfunction and impairments associated with GT and hip OA. As activity limitations do not appear to be differentiated by structural impairments, we suggest that pain, rather than the underlying pathology may be the driving impairment that leads to walking and single leg standing dysfunction.

KW - Bursitis

KW - GTPS

KW - Gluteal tendinopathy

KW - Hip osteoarthritis

KW - Hip pain

KW - Trendelenburg

KW - Walking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85002766560&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/pain-not-structural-impairments-explain-activity-limitations-people-gluteal-tendinopathy-hip-osteoar-1

U2 - 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.12.005

DO - 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.12.005

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 237

EP - 243

JO - Gait Posture

JF - Gait Posture

SN - 0966-6362

ER -