Part I Commentary 3

Proposing a pedagogical framework for the teaching and learning of spatial skills: A commentary on three chapters.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

Education, generally, and mathematics education specifically, have long-held associations with the field of psychology. Schoenfeld (1987) and Mayer (1992) both described the connections between the two fields and indeed, many educational theories of development evolved from psychology. To this point, one of the longest running groups in mathematics education derived from the field of cognitive psychology, namely, The International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (IGPME). IGPME was established in 1976 under the guidance of Efraim Fischbein, a cognitive psychologist. Initially, the focus was, as the name suggested, on the developmental and psychological complexities of learning various mathematical concepts and processes. However, over the years, the organization has broadened to include new ways of thinking about mathematics learning that go beyond the purely cognitive aspect. In fact, very few cognitive psychologists attend the annual conference these days. Although the direct insights and engagement of cognitive psychology researchers are not commonplace, some overlap remains.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVisualizing mathematics
Subtitle of host publicationThe role of spatial reasoning in mathematical thought
Place of PublicationThe Netherlands
PublisherSpringer
Chapter8
Pages171-182
Number of pages12
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9783319987675
ISBN (Print)9783319987668
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2018

Publication series

NameResearch in Mathematics Education
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)2570-4729

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LOWRIE, T., & LOGAN, T. (2018). Part I Commentary 3: Proposing a pedagogical framework for the teaching and learning of spatial skills: A commentary on three chapters. In Visualizing mathematics: The role of spatial reasoning in mathematical thought (1 ed., pp. 171-182). (Research in Mathematics Education). The Netherlands: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-98767-5_8