Perceived Diversity Norms, Cultural Identity Styles and Bicultural Identity Consolidation in two Bicultural Groups in Australia

Caroline Ng Tseung-Wong, Justine Dandy, Marguerite Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we investigate the relationships among contextual variables of perceived diversity norms- multiculturalism, assimilation and polyculturalism, identity styles and identity consolidation in bicultural Australians. The Multicultural Identity Styles Scale proposes two identity strategies, hybrid identity style (HIS) and alternating identity style (AIS) as processes through which individuals negotiate their bicultural identities. We test a model whereby perceived diversity norms predict bicultural identity consolidation directly and indirectly via HIS in samples of British (n = 195) and non-British (n = 181) Australians. Participants (56.9% females, mean age = 41.52) completed an online survey on perceived diversity norms, the MISS and bicultural identity consolidation. Results showed that for non-British Australians, there was a positive indirect effect of perceived multiculturalism norms on bicultural identity consolidation via HIS. Perceived assimilation was directly (and negatively) linked to bicultural identity consolidation but indirectly via HIS. In British Australians only perceived polyculturalism was directly and indirectly associated to bicultural identity consolidation via HIS, whereas perceived multiculturalism and assimilation norms were negatively associated to bicultural identity consolidation. The results are discussed in terms of the differential roles of perceived diversity norms on bicultural identity processes and consolidation relative to the nature of the cultural group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-371
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Psychology
Volume57
Issue number3
Early online date17 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

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