Persistence of two species of gecko (Oedura reticulata and Gehyra variegata) in remnant habitat

Stephen SARRE, Graeme Smith, Jacqui Meyers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    70 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Identifying the characteristics that make a species vulnerable to extinction following habitat fragmentation is one of the most pressing problems in conservation biology. One suggestion is that habitat specialists are less able to cope with rapid changes to their habitat or to move through the modified landscape than habitat generalists and so will be more vulnerable to extinction. We examine this hypothesis by comparing the distribution of two species of gecko, Gehyra variegata and Oedura reticulata, in patches of remnant woodland. The former species is a habitat generalist relative to the latter and shows a markedly higher level of persistence (97% remnant occupancy vs 72%). Logistic regression modelling of the presence or absence of O. reticulata revealed a significant correlation between the number of smooth-barked eucalypts (both species preferred by O. reticulata) in the remnant and the presence of O. reticulata. This suggests that the probability of extinction for a given population is related to the amount of suitable habitat in the remnant and is a function of processes operating at the population level rather than on a regional basis. Pitfall trapping in this study and evidence from another long-term study suggest that the movement of O. reticulata between remnants is negligible. As a consequence, this species has been unable to form a metapopulation at equilibrium. In contrast, it is likely that G. variegata is maintaining its widespread distribution through a metapopulation structure. These results demonstrate the importance of the ability to form a metapopulation for a species to maintain persistence in recently and highly fragmented ecosystems.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-33
    JournalBiological Conservation
    Volume71
    Publication statusPublished - 1995

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    Gekkonidae
    persistence
    habitat
    metapopulation
    habitats
    extinction
    generalist
    pressing
    habitat fragmentation
    trapping
    woodlands
    woodland
    logistics
    Biological Sciences
    ecosystems
    ecosystem
    modeling

    Cite this

    @article{43fc39b44f3f4f2f890a2d7150f2a8aa,
    title = "Persistence of two species of gecko (Oedura reticulata and Gehyra variegata) in remnant habitat",
    abstract = "Identifying the characteristics that make a species vulnerable to extinction following habitat fragmentation is one of the most pressing problems in conservation biology. One suggestion is that habitat specialists are less able to cope with rapid changes to their habitat or to move through the modified landscape than habitat generalists and so will be more vulnerable to extinction. We examine this hypothesis by comparing the distribution of two species of gecko, Gehyra variegata and Oedura reticulata, in patches of remnant woodland. The former species is a habitat generalist relative to the latter and shows a markedly higher level of persistence (97{\%} remnant occupancy vs 72{\%}). Logistic regression modelling of the presence or absence of O. reticulata revealed a significant correlation between the number of smooth-barked eucalypts (both species preferred by O. reticulata) in the remnant and the presence of O. reticulata. This suggests that the probability of extinction for a given population is related to the amount of suitable habitat in the remnant and is a function of processes operating at the population level rather than on a regional basis. Pitfall trapping in this study and evidence from another long-term study suggest that the movement of O. reticulata between remnants is negligible. As a consequence, this species has been unable to form a metapopulation at equilibrium. In contrast, it is likely that G. variegata is maintaining its widespread distribution through a metapopulation structure. These results demonstrate the importance of the ability to form a metapopulation for a species to maintain persistence in recently and highly fragmented ecosystems.",
    author = "Stephen SARRE and Graeme Smith and Jacqui Meyers",
    year = "1995",
    language = "English",
    volume = "71",
    pages = "25--33",
    journal = "Biological Conservation",
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    Persistence of two species of gecko (Oedura reticulata and Gehyra variegata) in remnant habitat. / SARRE, Stephen; Smith, Graeme; Meyers, Jacqui.

    In: Biological Conservation, Vol. 71, 1995, p. 25-33.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Persistence of two species of gecko (Oedura reticulata and Gehyra variegata) in remnant habitat

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    AU - Smith, Graeme

    AU - Meyers, Jacqui

    PY - 1995

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    AB - Identifying the characteristics that make a species vulnerable to extinction following habitat fragmentation is one of the most pressing problems in conservation biology. One suggestion is that habitat specialists are less able to cope with rapid changes to their habitat or to move through the modified landscape than habitat generalists and so will be more vulnerable to extinction. We examine this hypothesis by comparing the distribution of two species of gecko, Gehyra variegata and Oedura reticulata, in patches of remnant woodland. The former species is a habitat generalist relative to the latter and shows a markedly higher level of persistence (97% remnant occupancy vs 72%). Logistic regression modelling of the presence or absence of O. reticulata revealed a significant correlation between the number of smooth-barked eucalypts (both species preferred by O. reticulata) in the remnant and the presence of O. reticulata. This suggests that the probability of extinction for a given population is related to the amount of suitable habitat in the remnant and is a function of processes operating at the population level rather than on a regional basis. Pitfall trapping in this study and evidence from another long-term study suggest that the movement of O. reticulata between remnants is negligible. As a consequence, this species has been unable to form a metapopulation at equilibrium. In contrast, it is likely that G. variegata is maintaining its widespread distribution through a metapopulation structure. These results demonstrate the importance of the ability to form a metapopulation for a species to maintain persistence in recently and highly fragmented ecosystems.

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