Personality Disorders and the Five-Factor Model among French Speakers in Africa and Europe

Jérôme Rossier, Christine Rigozzi, Personality Across Culture Research Group, Caroline Ng Tseung-Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the relation between personality disorders (PDs) and the Five-Factor Model (FFM)—a dimensional model describing normal personality traits known for its invariance across cultures—in 2 different cultural settings. Several authors have suggested that PDs may be more accurately described using a dimensional model instead of a categorical one. Method: Subjects from 9 French-speaking African countries (n = 2014) and from Switzerland (n = 697) completed both the French version of the International Personality Disorder Examination screening questionnaire, assessing the 10 DSM-IV PDs, and the French version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, assessing the 5 domains and 30 facets of the FFM. Results: Correlations between PDs and the 5 domains of the FFM were similar in both samples. For example, neuroticism was highly correlated with borderline, avoidant, and dependent PDs in both Africa and Switzerland. The total rank-order correlation (rho) between the 2 correlation matrices was very high (rho = 0.93) and significant (P < 0.001), as were the rhos for all domains of the FFM and all PDs, except paranoid and dependent PDs. However, the rhos for PDs across facet scales were all highly significant (P < 0.001). Moreover, 80% of Widiger and colleagues' predictions and 70% of Lynam and Widiger's prototypes, concerning the relation between PDs and the FFM, were confirmed in both samples. Conclusions: The relation between PDs and the FFM was stable in 2 samples separated by a great cultural distance. These results suggest that a dimensional approach and in particular the FFM may be useful for describing PDs in various cultural settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)534-544
Number of pages11
JournalThe Canadian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Personality Disorders
Dependent Personality Disorder
Switzerland
Paranoid Personality Disorder
Personality Inventory
Borderline Personality Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Personality

Cite this

Rossier, Jérôme ; Rigozzi, Christine ; Personality Across Culture Research Group ; Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline. / Personality Disorders and the Five-Factor Model among French Speakers in Africa and Europe. In: The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 53, No. 8. pp. 534-544.
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Personality Disorders and the Five-Factor Model among French Speakers in Africa and Europe. / Rossier, Jérôme; Rigozzi, Christine; Personality Across Culture Research Group ; Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline.

In: The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 53, No. 8, 01.08.2008, p. 534-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Personality Disorders and the Five-Factor Model among French Speakers in Africa and Europe

AU - Rossier, Jérôme

AU - Rigozzi, Christine

AU - Personality Across Culture Research Group

AU - Adjahouisso, Marcel

AU - Ah-Kion, Jennifer

AU - Amoussou-Yeye, Dénis

AU - Barry, Oumar

AU - Bhowon, Uma

AU - Bouatta, Cherifa

AU - Dougoumalé Cissé, Daouda

AU - Dahourou, Donatien

AU - Mbodji, Mamadou

AU - Minga Minga, David

AU - Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline

AU - Nouri Romdhane, Mohamed

AU - Ondongo, François

AU - Sfayhi, Nicole

AU - Tsokini, Dieudonné

AU - Verardi, Sabrina

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