Physical Exercise and Cancer: Exploring Chemotherapy Infusion as an Opportunity for Movement

Roxanne Miller, Joseph Northey, Kellie Toohey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective: Exercise initiated in the early stages of cancer treatment may present as the most opportune time to reduce the detrimental side effects of treatment. Beginning exercise post-cancer treatment may not be early enough to elicit important improvements. The role of exercise alongside chemotherapy treatment, specifically during chemotherapy infusion may be an opportunity for the therapeutic delivery of exercise for cancer patients. Data Sources: Narrative review of peer-reviewed literature with a focus on exercise during chemotherapy infusions and therapeutic effects of exercise on the tumor microenvironment. Conclusion: Exercise initiated in the early stages of chemotherapy treatment may present as the most opportune time to improve therapeutic health outcomes and patient experience. If exercise during chemotherapy infusion could be feasible more testing is warranted to explore different modes including resistance-based exercise, dosage, intensity, and its potential affect on tumor hypoxia and chemotherapy drug uptake. Implications for Nursing Practice: Oncology nurses are in the ideal position to initiate the conversation about exercise during chemotherapy treatments specifically the opportunity to provide light exercise during chemotherapy infusion. Starting exercise during this time may be the most beneficial timing to decrease the myriad of treatment side effects experienced. Further research is required to explore the potential affect of exercise during chemotherapy infusion on health benefits, tumor hypoxia, and drug uptake, all of which seem to be positively affected by physical exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Article number151068
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalSeminars in Oncology Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Sep 2020

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