Physiological and perceptual effects of precooling in wheelchair basketball athletes

Peta Forsyth, Kate PUMPA, Emma Knight, J Miller

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To investigate the physiological and perceptual effects of three precooling strategies during pre-exercise rest in athletes with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Randomized, counterbalanced. Participants were precooled, then rested for 60 minutes (22.7 ± 0.2°C, 64.2 ± 2.6%RH). Setting: National Wheelchair Basketball Training Centre, Australia. Participants: Sixteen wheelchair basketball athletes with a SCI. Interventions: Participants were precooled through; 1) 10 minutes of 15.8°C cold water immersion (CWI), 2) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie (S) from sports drink; 3) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie with application of iced towels to the legs, torso and back/arms (ST); or 4) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of room temperature (22.3°C) sports drink (CON). Outcome measures: Core temperature (Tgi), skin temperature (Tsk), heart rate (HR), and thermal and gastrointestinal comfort. Results: Following CWI, a significant reduction in Tgi was observed compared to CON, with a greatest reduction of 1.58°C occurring 40 minutes post-cooling (95% CI [1.07, 2.10]). A significant reduction in Tgi following ST compared to CON was also observed at 20 minutes (0.56°C; [0.03, 1.09]) and 30 minutes (0.56°C; [0.04, 1.09]) post-cooling. Additionally, a significant interaction between impairment level and time was observed for Tgi and HR, demonstrating athletes with a higher level of impairment experienced a greater reduction in HR and significant decrease in rate of decline in Tgi, compared to lesser impaired athletes. Conclusion: CWI and ST can effectively lower body temperature in athletes with a SCI, and may assist in tolerating warm conditions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)671-678
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Spinal Cord Medicine
    Volume39
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Basketball
    Wheelchairs
    Athletes
    Immersion
    Spinal Cord Injuries
    Eating
    Heart Rate
    Sports
    Water
    Torso
    Temperature
    Skin Temperature
    Body Temperature
    Leg
    Arm
    Hot Temperature
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Exercise

    Cite this

    Forsyth, Peta ; PUMPA, Kate ; Knight, Emma ; Miller, J. / Physiological and perceptual effects of precooling in wheelchair basketball athletes. In: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 671-678.
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    title = "Physiological and perceptual effects of precooling in wheelchair basketball athletes",
    abstract = "Objective: To investigate the physiological and perceptual effects of three precooling strategies during pre-exercise rest in athletes with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Randomized, counterbalanced. Participants were precooled, then rested for 60 minutes (22.7 ± 0.2°C, 64.2 ± 2.6{\%}RH). Setting: National Wheelchair Basketball Training Centre, Australia. Participants: Sixteen wheelchair basketball athletes with a SCI. Interventions: Participants were precooled through; 1) 10 minutes of 15.8°C cold water immersion (CWI), 2) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie (S) from sports drink; 3) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie with application of iced towels to the legs, torso and back/arms (ST); or 4) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of room temperature (22.3°C) sports drink (CON). Outcome measures: Core temperature (Tgi), skin temperature (Tsk), heart rate (HR), and thermal and gastrointestinal comfort. Results: Following CWI, a significant reduction in Tgi was observed compared to CON, with a greatest reduction of 1.58°C occurring 40 minutes post-cooling (95{\%} CI [1.07, 2.10]). A significant reduction in Tgi following ST compared to CON was also observed at 20 minutes (0.56°C; [0.03, 1.09]) and 30 minutes (0.56°C; [0.04, 1.09]) post-cooling. Additionally, a significant interaction between impairment level and time was observed for Tgi and HR, demonstrating athletes with a higher level of impairment experienced a greater reduction in HR and significant decrease in rate of decline in Tgi, compared to lesser impaired athletes. Conclusion: CWI and ST can effectively lower body temperature in athletes with a SCI, and may assist in tolerating warm conditions.",
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    Physiological and perceptual effects of precooling in wheelchair basketball athletes. / Forsyth, Peta; PUMPA, Kate; Knight, Emma; Miller, J.

    In: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 6, 2016, p. 671-678.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Physiological and perceptual effects of precooling in wheelchair basketball athletes

    AU - Forsyth, Peta

    AU - PUMPA, Kate

    AU - Knight, Emma

    AU - Miller, J

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    N2 - Objective: To investigate the physiological and perceptual effects of three precooling strategies during pre-exercise rest in athletes with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Randomized, counterbalanced. Participants were precooled, then rested for 60 minutes (22.7 ± 0.2°C, 64.2 ± 2.6%RH). Setting: National Wheelchair Basketball Training Centre, Australia. Participants: Sixteen wheelchair basketball athletes with a SCI. Interventions: Participants were precooled through; 1) 10 minutes of 15.8°C cold water immersion (CWI), 2) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie (S) from sports drink; 3) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie with application of iced towels to the legs, torso and back/arms (ST); or 4) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of room temperature (22.3°C) sports drink (CON). Outcome measures: Core temperature (Tgi), skin temperature (Tsk), heart rate (HR), and thermal and gastrointestinal comfort. Results: Following CWI, a significant reduction in Tgi was observed compared to CON, with a greatest reduction of 1.58°C occurring 40 minutes post-cooling (95% CI [1.07, 2.10]). A significant reduction in Tgi following ST compared to CON was also observed at 20 minutes (0.56°C; [0.03, 1.09]) and 30 minutes (0.56°C; [0.04, 1.09]) post-cooling. Additionally, a significant interaction between impairment level and time was observed for Tgi and HR, demonstrating athletes with a higher level of impairment experienced a greater reduction in HR and significant decrease in rate of decline in Tgi, compared to lesser impaired athletes. Conclusion: CWI and ST can effectively lower body temperature in athletes with a SCI, and may assist in tolerating warm conditions.

    AB - Objective: To investigate the physiological and perceptual effects of three precooling strategies during pre-exercise rest in athletes with a spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Randomized, counterbalanced. Participants were precooled, then rested for 60 minutes (22.7 ± 0.2°C, 64.2 ± 2.6%RH). Setting: National Wheelchair Basketball Training Centre, Australia. Participants: Sixteen wheelchair basketball athletes with a SCI. Interventions: Participants were precooled through; 1) 10 minutes of 15.8°C cold water immersion (CWI), 2) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie (S) from sports drink; 3) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of slushie with application of iced towels to the legs, torso and back/arms (ST); or 4) ingestion of 6.8 g/kg-1 of room temperature (22.3°C) sports drink (CON). Outcome measures: Core temperature (Tgi), skin temperature (Tsk), heart rate (HR), and thermal and gastrointestinal comfort. Results: Following CWI, a significant reduction in Tgi was observed compared to CON, with a greatest reduction of 1.58°C occurring 40 minutes post-cooling (95% CI [1.07, 2.10]). A significant reduction in Tgi following ST compared to CON was also observed at 20 minutes (0.56°C; [0.03, 1.09]) and 30 minutes (0.56°C; [0.04, 1.09]) post-cooling. Additionally, a significant interaction between impairment level and time was observed for Tgi and HR, demonstrating athletes with a higher level of impairment experienced a greater reduction in HR and significant decrease in rate of decline in Tgi, compared to lesser impaired athletes. Conclusion: CWI and ST can effectively lower body temperature in athletes with a SCI, and may assist in tolerating warm conditions.

    KW - Body temperature regulation

    KW - Cooling

    KW - Paraplegia

    KW - Spinal cord injuries

    KW - Thermoregulation

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    JO - The Journal of the American Paraplegia Society

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