Police and investigative cooperation on match-fixing

An Australian experience

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

During 2015, Australia hosted a number of major international sporting events. Two of those sports were identified as being at particular risk of match-fixing: the Asian Football Confederation men’s Asian Cup and the International Cricket Council men’s World Cup. The volume and breadth of betting interest in football and cricket world-wide made the two events attractive to match-fixers with links to organised crime engaged in illegal gambling and money laundering. The threat of a match-fixing incident and the prospect of consequential damage to Australia’s sporting and event hosting reputation were perceived as warranting a coordinated response by government, law enforcement, sporting and other regulatory authorities which was led by the Australian Federal Police (‘AFP’). This chapter analyses the AFP’s role and reflects on its publicly reported experiences in responding to the match-fixing threat to these two major international sporting events. The jurisdiction and role of the AFP in Australia’s federal system where the national government does not hold direct legislative responsibility for criminal law or gambling regulation is analysed. The chapter argues that coordination and cooperation between law enforcement, sporting codes and other authorities in regard to information sharing was a crucial element for the successful campaign of targeting and disrupting known match-fixers. The chapter concludes with suggestions for authorities in Australia and other jurisdictions tasked with protecting major sports events from the threat of match-fixing.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMatch-Fixing in Sport
Subtitle of host publicationComparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Chapter10
Pages171-186
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781315228280
ISBN (Print)9780415785303
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Nov 2017
Externally publishedYes

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police
federal police
event
gambling
threat
experience
law enforcement
jurisdiction
Sports
money laundering
confederation
regulatory authority
organized crime
criminal law
reputation
incident
damages
campaign
regulation
responsibility

Cite this

Ordway, C. (2017). Police and investigative cooperation on match-fixing: An Australian experience. In Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond (pp. 171-186). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315228280
Ordway, Catherine. / Police and investigative cooperation on match-fixing : An Australian experience. Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond. Taylor and Francis, 2017. pp. 171-186
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Ordway, C 2017, Police and investigative cooperation on match-fixing: An Australian experience. in Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond. Taylor and Francis, pp. 171-186. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315228280

Police and investigative cooperation on match-fixing : An Australian experience. / Ordway, Catherine.

Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond. Taylor and Francis, 2017. p. 171-186.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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Ordway C. Police and investigative cooperation on match-fixing: An Australian experience. In Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond. Taylor and Francis. 2017. p. 171-186 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315228280