Potentially preventable complications of urinary tract infections, pressure areas, pneumonia, and delirium in hospitalised dementia patients: Retrospective cohort study

Kasia BAIL, Helen BERRY, Laurie Grealish, Brian Draper, Rosemary Karmel, Diane GIBSON, Ann Peut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: To identify rates of potentially preventable complications for dementia patients compared with non-dementia patients. Design: Retrospective cohort design using hospital discharge data for dementia patients, case matched on sex, age, comorbidity and surgical status on a 1 : 4 ratio to non-dementia patients. Setting: Public hospital discharge data from the state of New South Wales, Australia for 2006/2007. Participants: 426 276 overnight hospital episodes for patients aged 50 and above (census sample). Main outcome measures: Rates of preventable complications, with episode-level risk adjustment for 12 complications that are known to be sensitive to nursing care. Results: Controlling for age and comorbidities, surgical dementia patients had higher rates than non-dementia patients in seven of the 12 complications: urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, delirium, pneumonia, physiological and metabolic derangement (all at p<0.0001), sepsis and failure to rescue (at p<0.05). Medical dementia patients also had higher rates of these complications than did non-dementia patients. The highest rates and highest relative risk for dementia patients compared with non-dementia patients, in both medical and surgical populations, were found in four common complications: urinary tract infections, pressure areas, pneumonia and delirium. Conclusions: Compared with non-dementia patients, hospitalised dementia patients have higher rates of potentially preventable complications that might be responsive to nursing interventions
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Open
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Delirium
Urinary Tract Infections
Dementia
Pneumonia
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Pressure
Comorbidity
Hospital Design and Construction
Risk Adjustment
South Australia
New South Wales
Pressure Ulcer
Public Hospitals
Censuses
Nursing Care
Sepsis
Nursing

Cite this

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Potentially preventable complications of urinary tract infections, pressure areas, pneumonia, and delirium in hospitalised dementia patients: Retrospective cohort study. / BAIL, Kasia; BERRY, Helen; Grealish, Laurie; Draper, Brian; Karmel, Rosemary; GIBSON, Diane; Peut, Ann.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 3, No. 6, 2013, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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