Pre-sleep protein supplementation after an acute bout of evening resistance exercise does not improve next day performance or recovery in resistance trained men

Michael J. Ormsbee, Patrick G. Saracino, Margaret C. Morrissey, Jaymie Donaldson, Liliana I. Rentería, Andrew J. McKune

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    5 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Background: To evaluate the effect of pre-sleep protein supplementation after an acute bout of evening resistance training on next day performance and recovery the following day in physically active men. Methods: Eighteen resistance trained men performed a single bout of resistance exercise then received either a pre-sleep protein (PRO) supplement containing 40 g of casein protein (PRO; n = 10; mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 4 yrs; height = 1.81 ± 0.08 m; weight = 84.9 ± 9.5 kg) or a non-caloric, flavor matched placebo (PLA; n = 8; age = 28 ± 10 yrs; height = 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight = 86.7 ± 11.0 kg) 30 min before sleep (1 h after a standard recovery drink). Blood samples were obtained pre-exercise and the following morning (+12-h) to measure creatine kinase and C-reactive protein. Visual analog scales were utilized to assess perceived pain, hunger, and recovery. One-repetition maximum (1RM) tests for barbell bench press and squat were performed pre-exercise and the following morning (+12-h). Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (V.23) and p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in next morning performance or muscle damage biomarkers. However, pre-sleep PRO resulted in a lower perception of hunger that approached significance the following morning when compared to PLA (PRO:43.6 ± 31.2, PLA: 69.4 ± 2.22; 95% C.I. = −53.6, 2.0; p = 0.07; d = 0.95). Conclusions: Following an evening bout of exercise, pre-sleep PRO did not further improve next morning muscle damage biomarkers or maximal strength performance in resistance trained men compared to a non-caloric PLA. However, there may be implications for lower perceived hunger the next morning with pre-sleep PRO consumption compared to PLA.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)164-178
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
    Volume19
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 22 Apr 2022

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