Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rural Australian primary care: An exploratory study of the perspectives of clinicians and high-risk men

Leigh Kinsman, Rachel Tham, Julie Symons, Michael Jones, Stephen Campbell, Ann Allenby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rural primary care services have the potential to play a major role in reducing the gap in cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes between rural and metropolitan Australians, particularly in men at high risk of CVD. The aim of this study was to explore the self-reported behaviours and satisfaction with their general practice/practitioner of men at high risk of CVD, and attitudes of rural primary care clinicians regarding the role of primary care in CVD prevention. This observational research was addressed through survey questionnaires with rural men at high risk of CVD and semi-structured interviews with rural primary care clinicians. Fourteen rural primary care practices from towns with populations less than 25 000 participated. One hundred and fifty-eight high-risk men completed the questionnaire. Their responses demonstrated poorly controlled risk factors despite a willingness to change. Alternatively, rural primary care clinicians (n = 20) reported that patients were unlikely to change and that illness-based funding models inhibited cardiovascular preventive activities. Australians living in rural areas have worse CVD outcomes. In addition, there is a disparity in the assumptions of health providers and male patients at high risk of CVD in rural areas. This necessitates innovative rural primary care models that include a blended payment system that incentivises or funds preventive care alongside an emphasis on lifestyle advice, as well as an explicit strategy to influence clinician and patient behaviour to help address the disparity
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)510-516
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
Volume22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Health Care
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Models
Preventive Medicine
Financial Management
General Practice
General Practitioners
Life Style
Interviews
Health
Research
Population

Cite this

Kinsman, Leigh ; Tham, Rachel ; Symons, Julie ; Jones, Michael ; Campbell, Stephen ; Allenby, Ann. / Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rural Australian primary care: An exploratory study of the perspectives of clinicians and high-risk men. In: Australian Journal of Primary Health. 2016 ; Vol. 22. pp. 510-516.
@article{af255a8984a14cf8b2e320bad6f9b21a,
title = "Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rural Australian primary care: An exploratory study of the perspectives of clinicians and high-risk men",
abstract = "Rural primary care services have the potential to play a major role in reducing the gap in cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes between rural and metropolitan Australians, particularly in men at high risk of CVD. The aim of this study was to explore the self-reported behaviours and satisfaction with their general practice/practitioner of men at high risk of CVD, and attitudes of rural primary care clinicians regarding the role of primary care in CVD prevention. This observational research was addressed through survey questionnaires with rural men at high risk of CVD and semi-structured interviews with rural primary care clinicians. Fourteen rural primary care practices from towns with populations less than 25 000 participated. One hundred and fifty-eight high-risk men completed the questionnaire. Their responses demonstrated poorly controlled risk factors despite a willingness to change. Alternatively, rural primary care clinicians (n = 20) reported that patients were unlikely to change and that illness-based funding models inhibited cardiovascular preventive activities. Australians living in rural areas have worse CVD outcomes. In addition, there is a disparity in the assumptions of health providers and male patients at high risk of CVD in rural areas. This necessitates innovative rural primary care models that include a blended payment system that incentivises or funds preventive care alongside an emphasis on lifestyle advice, as well as an explicit strategy to influence clinician and patient behaviour to help address the disparity",
author = "Leigh Kinsman and Rachel Tham and Julie Symons and Michael Jones and Stephen Campbell and Ann Allenby",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1071/PY15091",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "510--516",
journal = "Australian Journal of Primary Health - Interchange",
issn = "1324-2296",
publisher = "CSIRO",

}

Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rural Australian primary care: An exploratory study of the perspectives of clinicians and high-risk men. / Kinsman, Leigh; Tham, Rachel; Symons, Julie; Jones, Michael; Campbell, Stephen; Allenby, Ann.

In: Australian Journal of Primary Health, Vol. 22, 2016, p. 510-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rural Australian primary care: An exploratory study of the perspectives of clinicians and high-risk men

AU - Kinsman, Leigh

AU - Tham, Rachel

AU - Symons, Julie

AU - Jones, Michael

AU - Campbell, Stephen

AU - Allenby, Ann

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Rural primary care services have the potential to play a major role in reducing the gap in cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes between rural and metropolitan Australians, particularly in men at high risk of CVD. The aim of this study was to explore the self-reported behaviours and satisfaction with their general practice/practitioner of men at high risk of CVD, and attitudes of rural primary care clinicians regarding the role of primary care in CVD prevention. This observational research was addressed through survey questionnaires with rural men at high risk of CVD and semi-structured interviews with rural primary care clinicians. Fourteen rural primary care practices from towns with populations less than 25 000 participated. One hundred and fifty-eight high-risk men completed the questionnaire. Their responses demonstrated poorly controlled risk factors despite a willingness to change. Alternatively, rural primary care clinicians (n = 20) reported that patients were unlikely to change and that illness-based funding models inhibited cardiovascular preventive activities. Australians living in rural areas have worse CVD outcomes. In addition, there is a disparity in the assumptions of health providers and male patients at high risk of CVD in rural areas. This necessitates innovative rural primary care models that include a blended payment system that incentivises or funds preventive care alongside an emphasis on lifestyle advice, as well as an explicit strategy to influence clinician and patient behaviour to help address the disparity

AB - Rural primary care services have the potential to play a major role in reducing the gap in cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes between rural and metropolitan Australians, particularly in men at high risk of CVD. The aim of this study was to explore the self-reported behaviours and satisfaction with their general practice/practitioner of men at high risk of CVD, and attitudes of rural primary care clinicians regarding the role of primary care in CVD prevention. This observational research was addressed through survey questionnaires with rural men at high risk of CVD and semi-structured interviews with rural primary care clinicians. Fourteen rural primary care practices from towns with populations less than 25 000 participated. One hundred and fifty-eight high-risk men completed the questionnaire. Their responses demonstrated poorly controlled risk factors despite a willingness to change. Alternatively, rural primary care clinicians (n = 20) reported that patients were unlikely to change and that illness-based funding models inhibited cardiovascular preventive activities. Australians living in rural areas have worse CVD outcomes. In addition, there is a disparity in the assumptions of health providers and male patients at high risk of CVD in rural areas. This necessitates innovative rural primary care models that include a blended payment system that incentivises or funds preventive care alongside an emphasis on lifestyle advice, as well as an explicit strategy to influence clinician and patient behaviour to help address the disparity

U2 - 10.1071/PY15091

DO - 10.1071/PY15091

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 510

EP - 516

JO - Australian Journal of Primary Health - Interchange

JF - Australian Journal of Primary Health - Interchange

SN - 1324-2296

ER -