Previously identified patellar tendinopathy risk factors differ between elite and sub-elite volleyball players

Ina Janssen, J. R. Steele, B. J. Munro, N. A.T. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P<0.05) assessed for between-group differences in risk factors or patellar tendon loading. Significant interaction effects were further evaluated using post-hoc univariate analysis of variance tests. Landing kinematics, neuromuscular activation patterns, patellar tendon loading, and most of the previously identified risk factors did not differ between the elite and sub-elite players. However, elite players participated in a higher training volume and had less quadriceps extensibility than sub-elite players. Therefore, high training volume is likely the primary contributor to the injury discrepancy between elite and sub-elite volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)308-314
Number of pages7
JournalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Volleyball
Tendinopathy
Patellar Ligament
Biomechanical Phenomena
Analysis of Variance
Knee Injuries
Muscle Strength
Athletes
Lower Extremity
Multivariate Analysis
History
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

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abstract = "Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P<0.05) assessed for between-group differences in risk factors or patellar tendon loading. Significant interaction effects were further evaluated using post-hoc univariate analysis of variance tests. Landing kinematics, neuromuscular activation patterns, patellar tendon loading, and most of the previously identified risk factors did not differ between the elite and sub-elite players. However, elite players participated in a higher training volume and had less quadriceps extensibility than sub-elite players. Therefore, high training volume is likely the primary contributor to the injury discrepancy between elite and sub-elite volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players.",
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Previously identified patellar tendinopathy risk factors differ between elite and sub-elite volleyball players. / Janssen, Ina; Steele, J. R.; Munro, B. J.; Brown, N. A.T.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, Vol. 25, No. 3, 2015, p. 308-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P<0.05) assessed for between-group differences in risk factors or patellar tendon loading. Significant interaction effects were further evaluated using post-hoc univariate analysis of variance tests. Landing kinematics, neuromuscular activation patterns, patellar tendon loading, and most of the previously identified risk factors did not differ between the elite and sub-elite players. However, elite players participated in a higher training volume and had less quadriceps extensibility than sub-elite players. Therefore, high training volume is likely the primary contributor to the injury discrepancy between elite and sub-elite volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players.

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