Primary healthcare clinicians' positive perceptions of the implementation of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic using normalisation process theory

Kaye Ervin, Jennifer Weller-Newton, Jacque Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
28 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The objective of the study was to measure implementation of telehealth for client consultations from Allied Health and Community Health clinicians' perspectives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Purposeful sampling was used to invite allied and community health clinicians to complete the survey. An online survey design, underpinned by normalisation process theory, utilising the NoMAD tool, which consists of 19 implementation assessment items. Descriptive statistics are reported. A 66% (n = 24) response rate was obtained. Fifty-two percent indicated they were using telehealth for the first time. Despite the rapid implementation of telehealth for client consultations due to the pandemic crisis, participants reported positive perceptions of the use of telehealth when measured using the NoMAD. Fifty-eight percent (n = 14) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that telehealth will become a normal part of their work. Despite unplanned and under-resourced implementation of telehealth, Allied Health and Community Health clinicians reported very positive perceptions. However, further education and training to ensure 'normalisation' of this model may be required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-162
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

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