Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia

Louise Watson

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    Abstract

    The use of private tutoring by school-aged children in Australia is increasing and the Australian government now provides vouchers for private tutoring to students who fall below national benchmarks in literacy and numeracy. This paper analyses private tutoring in Australia and finds that although Australia ranks low on international comparisons in terms of student participation, average household expenditure on private tutoring is increasing. We observe higher levels of expenditure among wealthy households and different patterns of household expenditure on private tutoring between the two largest states. The paper discusses factors that appear to influence participation in private tutoring such as structural features of state education systems, total household income and private school fees. The quality and costeffectiveness of government funded private tutoring as an educational intervention is also discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Research Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2008
    EditorsPeter Jeffrey
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherAustralian Association for Research in Education
    Pages1-15
    Number of pages15
    Publication statusPublished - 2009
    EventAustralian Association for Research in Australia (AARE) National Conference - Brisbane, Australia
    Duration: 30 Nov 20094 Dec 2009

    Publication series

    NameAustralian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings
    PublisherAustralian Association for Research in Education
    ISSN (Electronic)1324-9320

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian Association for Research in Australia (AARE) National Conference
    CountryAustralia
    CityBrisbane
    Period30/11/094/12/09

    Fingerprint

    expenditures
    participation
    international comparison
    private school
    household income
    fee
    education system
    student
    literacy
    school

    Cite this

    Watson, L. (2009). Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia. In P. Jeffrey (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Research Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2008 (pp. 1-15). (Australian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings). Australia: Australian Association for Research in Education.
    Watson, Louise. / Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia. Proceedings of the International Research Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2008. editor / Peter Jeffrey. Australia : Australian Association for Research in Education, 2009. pp. 1-15 (Australian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings).
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    title = "Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia",
    abstract = "The use of private tutoring by school-aged children in Australia is increasing and the Australian government now provides vouchers for private tutoring to students who fall below national benchmarks in literacy and numeracy. This paper analyses private tutoring in Australia and finds that although Australia ranks low on international comparisons in terms of student participation, average household expenditure on private tutoring is increasing. We observe higher levels of expenditure among wealthy households and different patterns of household expenditure on private tutoring between the two largest states. The paper discusses factors that appear to influence participation in private tutoring such as structural features of state education systems, total household income and private school fees. The quality and costeffectiveness of government funded private tutoring as an educational intervention is also discussed.",
    author = "Louise Watson",
    year = "2009",
    language = "English",
    series = "Australian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings",
    publisher = "Australian Association for Research in Education",
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    Watson, L 2009, Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia. in P Jeffrey (ed.), Proceedings of the International Research Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2008. Australian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings, Australian Association for Research in Education, Australia, pp. 1-15, Australian Association for Research in Australia (AARE) National Conference, Brisbane, Australia, 30/11/09.

    Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia. / Watson, Louise.

    Proceedings of the International Research Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2008. ed. / Peter Jeffrey. Australia : Australian Association for Research in Education, 2009. p. 1-15 (Australian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings).

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    AB - The use of private tutoring by school-aged children in Australia is increasing and the Australian government now provides vouchers for private tutoring to students who fall below national benchmarks in literacy and numeracy. This paper analyses private tutoring in Australia and finds that although Australia ranks low on international comparisons in terms of student participation, average household expenditure on private tutoring is increasing. We observe higher levels of expenditure among wealthy households and different patterns of household expenditure on private tutoring between the two largest states. The paper discusses factors that appear to influence participation in private tutoring such as structural features of state education systems, total household income and private school fees. The quality and costeffectiveness of government funded private tutoring as an educational intervention is also discussed.

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    Watson L. Private Expectations and public schooling: the growth of private tutoring in Australia. In Jeffrey P, editor, Proceedings of the International Research Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2008. Australia: Australian Association for Research in Education. 2009. p. 1-15. (Australian Association for Research in Education Conference Proceedings).