Propagule size and the relative success of exotic ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand

D.M. Forsyth, R.P. Duncan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    104 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We investigated factors affecting the success of 14 species of ungulates introduced to New Zealand around 1851-1926. The 11 successful species had a shorter maximum life span and were introduced in greater numbers than the three unsuccessful species. Because introduction effort was confounded with other life-history traits, we examined whether independent introductions of the same species were more likely to succeed when a greater number of individuals were introduced. For the six species with introductions that both succeeded and failed, successful introductions always involved an equal or greater number of individuals than unsuccessful introductions of the same species. For all independent introductions, there was a highly significant relationship between the number of individuals introduced and introduction success. When data for ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand were combined, a variable categorizing species as ungulate or bird was a highly significant predictor of introduction success, after variation in introduction effort was controlled. For a given number of individuals introduced, ungulates were much more likely to succeed than birds.
    Original languageUndefined
    Pages (from-to)583-595
    Number of pages13
    JournalAmerican Naturalist
    Volume157
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

    Cite this

    @article{84043e53347844fc9f598104b88ca44c,
    title = "Propagule size and the relative success of exotic ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand",
    abstract = "We investigated factors affecting the success of 14 species of ungulates introduced to New Zealand around 1851-1926. The 11 successful species had a shorter maximum life span and were introduced in greater numbers than the three unsuccessful species. Because introduction effort was confounded with other life-history traits, we examined whether independent introductions of the same species were more likely to succeed when a greater number of individuals were introduced. For the six species with introductions that both succeeded and failed, successful introductions always involved an equal or greater number of individuals than unsuccessful introductions of the same species. For all independent introductions, there was a highly significant relationship between the number of individuals introduced and introduction success. When data for ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand were combined, a variable categorizing species as ungulate or bird was a highly significant predictor of introduction success, after variation in introduction effort was controlled. For a given number of individuals introduced, ungulates were much more likely to succeed than birds.",
    author = "D.M. Forsyth and R.P. Duncan",
    note = "cited By 101",
    year = "2001",
    doi = "10.1086/320626",
    language = "Undefined",
    volume = "157",
    pages = "583--595",
    journal = "American Naturalist",
    issn = "0003-0147",
    publisher = "University of Chicago",
    number = "6",

    }

    Propagule size and the relative success of exotic ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand. / Forsyth, D.M.; Duncan, R.P.

    In: American Naturalist, Vol. 157, No. 6, 2001, p. 583-595.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Propagule size and the relative success of exotic ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand

    AU - Forsyth, D.M.

    AU - Duncan, R.P.

    N1 - cited By 101

    PY - 2001

    Y1 - 2001

    N2 - We investigated factors affecting the success of 14 species of ungulates introduced to New Zealand around 1851-1926. The 11 successful species had a shorter maximum life span and were introduced in greater numbers than the three unsuccessful species. Because introduction effort was confounded with other life-history traits, we examined whether independent introductions of the same species were more likely to succeed when a greater number of individuals were introduced. For the six species with introductions that both succeeded and failed, successful introductions always involved an equal or greater number of individuals than unsuccessful introductions of the same species. For all independent introductions, there was a highly significant relationship between the number of individuals introduced and introduction success. When data for ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand were combined, a variable categorizing species as ungulate or bird was a highly significant predictor of introduction success, after variation in introduction effort was controlled. For a given number of individuals introduced, ungulates were much more likely to succeed than birds.

    AB - We investigated factors affecting the success of 14 species of ungulates introduced to New Zealand around 1851-1926. The 11 successful species had a shorter maximum life span and were introduced in greater numbers than the three unsuccessful species. Because introduction effort was confounded with other life-history traits, we examined whether independent introductions of the same species were more likely to succeed when a greater number of individuals were introduced. For the six species with introductions that both succeeded and failed, successful introductions always involved an equal or greater number of individuals than unsuccessful introductions of the same species. For all independent introductions, there was a highly significant relationship between the number of individuals introduced and introduction success. When data for ungulate and bird introductions to New Zealand were combined, a variable categorizing species as ungulate or bird was a highly significant predictor of introduction success, after variation in introduction effort was controlled. For a given number of individuals introduced, ungulates were much more likely to succeed than birds.

    U2 - 10.1086/320626

    DO - 10.1086/320626

    M3 - Article

    VL - 157

    SP - 583

    EP - 595

    JO - American Naturalist

    JF - American Naturalist

    SN - 0003-0147

    IS - 6

    ER -