Property Management Orders in the Mental Health Context: Protection or Empowerment

Fleur Beaupert, Terry Carney, David Tait, Vivienne Topp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Control over personal property is something most citizens take for granted.
Yet historically, such control was automatically and indefinitely denied to people
involuntarily detained in mental institutions.2 Adult guardianship reforms in the
1980s established multi-disciplinary guardianship tribunals to replace resort to
the inherent protective jurisdiction of superior courts. The new guardianship
legislation introduced presumptions favouring orders involving minimal
restrictions on liberty.3
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)795-824
Number of pages30
JournalUniversity of New South Wales Law Journal
Volume31
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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