Proposed nurse-led initiatives in improving physical health of people with serious mental illness: A survey of nurses in mental health

Brenda HAPPELL, Chris PLATANIA-PHUNG, DAVID SCOTT

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To identify nurse perceptions on the potential value of general and specific nursing approaches to improving physical health outcomes of people with serious mental illness. Background: People diagnosed with serious mental illnesses experience heightened rates of physical illnesses and can be supported better via healthcare system prevention and management. Nurses working in mental health are a critical part of a system-wide approach to improving physical health care, but there is little known on their views on specific approaches within Australia (e.g. screening for risks, stigma reduction). Design: A national, cross-sectional and nonrandom survey study delivered online. Methods: Members of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses (n = 643), representing nurses employed in mental healthcare services across Australia (71·6% from public mental health services). Participants were asked to rate the potential of nine nurse-based strategies for improving physical health (options: 'yes', 'no', 'not sure') and the potential value of 10 nursing and general strategies for improving physical health (rating from 'negative value' to 'significant value'). Results: There was a high endorsement of all nine nurse-based strategies for physical health (e.g. lifestyle programmes, screening, linking services), although there was less support for reducing antipsychotics or advocating for fewer side effects. Participants mainly viewed all strategies as of moderate to significant value, with the most promising value attached to colocation of primary and mental care services, lifestyle programmes and improving primary care services (reduce stigma, train GPs). Conclusions: Australian nurses working in mental health services view a range of nurse-based strategies for improving physical healthcare services and standards as important. Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses collectively need to work with consumers, health agencies and the general public to further define how to organise and implement physical health integration strategies, towards more comprehensive health care of people with serious mental illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1018-1029
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume23
Issue number7-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Mental Health
Nurses
Health
Delivery of Health Care
Mental Health Services
Life Style
Primary Health Care
Nursing
Comprehensive Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States Public Health Service
Risk Reduction Behavior
Antipsychotic Agents
Cross-Sectional Studies

Cite this

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abstract = "Aims and objectives: To identify nurse perceptions on the potential value of general and specific nursing approaches to improving physical health outcomes of people with serious mental illness. Background: People diagnosed with serious mental illnesses experience heightened rates of physical illnesses and can be supported better via healthcare system prevention and management. Nurses working in mental health are a critical part of a system-wide approach to improving physical health care, but there is little known on their views on specific approaches within Australia (e.g. screening for risks, stigma reduction). Design: A national, cross-sectional and nonrandom survey study delivered online. Methods: Members of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses (n = 643), representing nurses employed in mental healthcare services across Australia (71·6{\%} from public mental health services). Participants were asked to rate the potential of nine nurse-based strategies for improving physical health (options: 'yes', 'no', 'not sure') and the potential value of 10 nursing and general strategies for improving physical health (rating from 'negative value' to 'significant value'). Results: There was a high endorsement of all nine nurse-based strategies for physical health (e.g. lifestyle programmes, screening, linking services), although there was less support for reducing antipsychotics or advocating for fewer side effects. Participants mainly viewed all strategies as of moderate to significant value, with the most promising value attached to colocation of primary and mental care services, lifestyle programmes and improving primary care services (reduce stigma, train GPs). Conclusions: Australian nurses working in mental health services view a range of nurse-based strategies for improving physical healthcare services and standards as important. Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses collectively need to work with consumers, health agencies and the general public to further define how to organise and implement physical health integration strategies, towards more comprehensive health care of people with serious mental illness.",
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Proposed nurse-led initiatives in improving physical health of people with serious mental illness: A survey of nurses in mental health. / HAPPELL, Brenda; PLATANIA-PHUNG, Chris; SCOTT, DAVID.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 23, No. 7-8, 2014, p. 1018-1029.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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