Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine (DOPA), a redox-active product of protein oxidation as a trigger for antioxidant defences

Michelle Nelson, Ruth Foxwell, Peter Charles TYRER, Roger T. Dean

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Protein hydroperoxides and protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are amongst the major long-lived redox-active products during free radical attack on proteins. Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can redox cycle between catechol and quinone form, and bind transition metals, whereas hydroperoxides are converted to stable hydroxides. The free amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a normal metabolite, an oxidation product of tyrosine, involved in pathways of dopamine and melanin production, and we have shown that it may be incorporated into protein-by-protein synthesis. However, physiological levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are very low; yet remarkably elevated levels occur in some pathologies. We propose that, unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a signal for the activation of cellular defences both against the oxidative fluxes during oxidative stress and against the oxidative damage which sometimes ensues. Unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, the levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can change 5–10-fold during oxidative damage in vivo, an appropriate property for a signalling molecule. We suggest mechanisms by which protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine might trigger oxidative defences, via NF-κB and other transcription factors. Little evidence yet bears directly on this, but we discuss some implications of observations on free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine supply to cells in vitro, to Parkinson's patients, and to animal models of the disease. Several of the effects of 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine in these situations may be mediated by the production and actions of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine. Some experimental tests of the hypothesis are outlined and some possible therapeutic implications
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)879-889
    Number of pages11
    JournalThe International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
    Volume39
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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    Oxidation-Reduction
    Antioxidants
    Oxidation
    Proteins
    Hydrogen Peroxide
    Hydroxides
    Animal Disease Models
    Oxidative stress
    Pathology
    Metabolites
    Free Radicals
    Transition metals
    Tyrosine
    Animals
    Oxidative Stress
    Transcription Factors
    Metals
    Chemical activation
    Fluxes
    Amino Acids

    Cite this

    @article{783155b2bf8e4b7d8b11f77d4e7e5571,
    title = "Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine (DOPA), a redox-active product of protein oxidation as a trigger for antioxidant defences",
    abstract = "Protein hydroperoxides and protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are amongst the major long-lived redox-active products during free radical attack on proteins. Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can redox cycle between catechol and quinone form, and bind transition metals, whereas hydroperoxides are converted to stable hydroxides. The free amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a normal metabolite, an oxidation product of tyrosine, involved in pathways of dopamine and melanin production, and we have shown that it may be incorporated into protein-by-protein synthesis. However, physiological levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are very low; yet remarkably elevated levels occur in some pathologies. We propose that, unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a signal for the activation of cellular defences both against the oxidative fluxes during oxidative stress and against the oxidative damage which sometimes ensues. Unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, the levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can change 5–10-fold during oxidative damage in vivo, an appropriate property for a signalling molecule. We suggest mechanisms by which protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine might trigger oxidative defences, via NF-κB and other transcription factors. Little evidence yet bears directly on this, but we discuss some implications of observations on free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine supply to cells in vitro, to Parkinson's patients, and to animal models of the disease. Several of the effects of 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine in these situations may be mediated by the production and actions of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine. Some experimental tests of the hypothesis are outlined and some possible therapeutic implications",
    author = "Michelle Nelson and Ruth Foxwell and TYRER, {Peter Charles} and Dean, {Roger T.}",
    year = "2007",
    doi = "10.1016/j.biocel.2006.10.004",
    language = "English",
    volume = "39",
    pages = "879--889",
    journal = "International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology",
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    }

    Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine (DOPA), a redox-active product of protein oxidation as a trigger for antioxidant defences. / Nelson, Michelle; Foxwell, Ruth; TYRER, Peter Charles; Dean, Roger T.

    In: The International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Vol. 39, No. 5, 2007, p. 879-889.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine (DOPA), a redox-active product of protein oxidation as a trigger for antioxidant defences

    AU - Nelson, Michelle

    AU - Foxwell, Ruth

    AU - TYRER, Peter Charles

    AU - Dean, Roger T.

    PY - 2007

    Y1 - 2007

    N2 - Protein hydroperoxides and protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are amongst the major long-lived redox-active products during free radical attack on proteins. Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can redox cycle between catechol and quinone form, and bind transition metals, whereas hydroperoxides are converted to stable hydroxides. The free amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a normal metabolite, an oxidation product of tyrosine, involved in pathways of dopamine and melanin production, and we have shown that it may be incorporated into protein-by-protein synthesis. However, physiological levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are very low; yet remarkably elevated levels occur in some pathologies. We propose that, unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a signal for the activation of cellular defences both against the oxidative fluxes during oxidative stress and against the oxidative damage which sometimes ensues. Unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, the levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can change 5–10-fold during oxidative damage in vivo, an appropriate property for a signalling molecule. We suggest mechanisms by which protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine might trigger oxidative defences, via NF-κB and other transcription factors. Little evidence yet bears directly on this, but we discuss some implications of observations on free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine supply to cells in vitro, to Parkinson's patients, and to animal models of the disease. Several of the effects of 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine in these situations may be mediated by the production and actions of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine. Some experimental tests of the hypothesis are outlined and some possible therapeutic implications

    AB - Protein hydroperoxides and protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are amongst the major long-lived redox-active products during free radical attack on proteins. Protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can redox cycle between catechol and quinone form, and bind transition metals, whereas hydroperoxides are converted to stable hydroxides. The free amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a normal metabolite, an oxidation product of tyrosine, involved in pathways of dopamine and melanin production, and we have shown that it may be incorporated into protein-by-protein synthesis. However, physiological levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine are very low; yet remarkably elevated levels occur in some pathologies. We propose that, unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine is a signal for the activation of cellular defences both against the oxidative fluxes during oxidative stress and against the oxidative damage which sometimes ensues. Unlike free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine, the levels of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine can change 5–10-fold during oxidative damage in vivo, an appropriate property for a signalling molecule. We suggest mechanisms by which protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine might trigger oxidative defences, via NF-κB and other transcription factors. Little evidence yet bears directly on this, but we discuss some implications of observations on free 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine supply to cells in vitro, to Parkinson's patients, and to animal models of the disease. Several of the effects of 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine in these situations may be mediated by the production and actions of protein-bound 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylanine. Some experimental tests of the hypothesis are outlined and some possible therapeutic implications

    U2 - 10.1016/j.biocel.2006.10.004

    DO - 10.1016/j.biocel.2006.10.004

    M3 - Article

    VL - 39

    SP - 879

    EP - 889

    JO - International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

    JF - International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

    SN - 1357-2725

    IS - 5

    ER -