Public Connection with Local Government: Desires and Frustrations of Articulating Local Issues

Julie FREEMAN, Kerry MCCALLUM

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

This paper provides an empirical account of public participation within an Australian local government context. It seeks to determine the ways civic discourse is articulated and how (if at all) this facilitates civic connection with local government. Through in-depth interviews and focus groups with local citizens from the Victorian municipality of the City of Casey, this paper explores citizens’ understandings, experiences and expectations in relation to participation with local government. Citizens conveyed a strong desire for engagement, as well as frustration that the local government is disinterested in civic input and fails to keep the community adequately informed. Participants suggested that this situation is creating both a sense of disconnection from government and civic reluctance to further engage in local political matters. These civic insights reveal a precarious state of local politics, and highlight the complexities and tensions in the relationship between local governments, citizens and democratic participation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference 2013: Refereed Papers
EditorsJulie Freeman
Place of PublicationCanberra
PublisherNews Media Research Centre, University of Canberra
Pages137-148
Number of pages12
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9781740883870
ISBN (Print)9781740883863
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventEmerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference - University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
Duration: 18 Nov 201319 Nov 2013

Conference

ConferenceEmerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period18/11/1319/11/13

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Cite this

FREEMAN, J., & MCCALLUM, K. (2013). Public Connection with Local Government: Desires and Frustrations of Articulating Local Issues. In J. Freeman (Ed.), Proceedings of the Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference 2013: Refereed Papers (Vol. 1, pp. 137-148). Canberra: News Media Research Centre, University of Canberra.
FREEMAN, Julie ; MCCALLUM, Kerry. / Public Connection with Local Government: Desires and Frustrations of Articulating Local Issues. Proceedings of the Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference 2013: Refereed Papers. editor / Julie Freeman. Vol. 1 Canberra : News Media Research Centre, University of Canberra, 2013. pp. 137-148
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FREEMAN, J & MCCALLUM, K 2013, Public Connection with Local Government: Desires and Frustrations of Articulating Local Issues. in J Freeman (ed.), Proceedings of the Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference 2013: Refereed Papers. vol. 1, News Media Research Centre, University of Canberra, Canberra, pp. 137-148, Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference, Canberra, Australia, 18/11/13.

Public Connection with Local Government: Desires and Frustrations of Articulating Local Issues. / FREEMAN, Julie; MCCALLUM, Kerry.

Proceedings of the Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference 2013: Refereed Papers. ed. / Julie Freeman. Vol. 1 Canberra : News Media Research Centre, University of Canberra, 2013. p. 137-148.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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FREEMAN J, MCCALLUM K. Public Connection with Local Government: Desires and Frustrations of Articulating Local Issues. In Freeman J, editor, Proceedings of the Emerging Issues in Communication Research and Policy Conference 2013: Refereed Papers. Vol. 1. Canberra: News Media Research Centre, University of Canberra. 2013. p. 137-148