Raising the Alarm? Role Definition for Prosecutors in Criminal Cases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forensic scientific evidence is becoming increasingly important to the criminal justice system. However, it is essential not to become complacent about the possibility of errors occurring with such evidence. The case of the wrongful conviction of Mr Farah Jama in Victoria on no more than a single piece of flawed DNA evidence serves as an object lesson for all actors involved in the investigation and prosecution of criminal cases to adopt a critical approach to forensic scientific evidence. This article discusses the role of the prosecutor with reference to practice in New South Wales and the particular recommendation of the inquiry conducted by Mr Frank Vincent AO QC into the Jama case that the investigator, the forensic specialist and the prosecutor find ways to work together that respect their independence while ensuring that the possibility for error is minimised
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-29
Number of pages15
JournalAustralian Journal of Forensic Sciences
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Criminal Law
New South Wales
Victoria
Research Personnel
DNA

Cite this

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Raising the Alarm? Role Definition for Prosecutors in Criminal Cases. / Krone, Anthony.

In: Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 44, No. 1, 2012, p. 15-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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