Re:

The dark side of occupation: A concept for consideration

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twinley (2013) challenged readers of this journal to reconsider notions of occupation as a positive and life‐affirming influence. Furthermore, she detailed ways in which the concept of occupation must necessarily include facets of life that are not commensurate with health and wellbeing, as well as those that are antisocial, illegal and/or immoral. The discussion is a critical one as occupational therapy diversifies from the select cultures and caseloads from which many of its theoretical premises were derived. I congratulate the author on a thought‐provoking article and I suggest that such a complex consideration of the relationship between occupation and health is pivotal at this point of the profession's evolution. It is important to test the robustness of these founding notions if we are to expand our theories to include the populations with which we now find ourselves involved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-459
Number of pages2
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

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title = "Re:: The dark side of occupation: A concept for consideration",
abstract = "Twinley (2013) challenged readers of this journal to reconsider notions of occupation as a positive and life‐affirming influence. Furthermore, she detailed ways in which the concept of occupation must necessarily include facets of life that are not commensurate with health and wellbeing, as well as those that are antisocial, illegal and/or immoral. The discussion is a critical one as occupational therapy diversifies from the select cultures and caseloads from which many of its theoretical premises were derived. I congratulate the author on a thought‐provoking article and I suggest that such a complex consideration of the relationship between occupation and health is pivotal at this point of the profession's evolution. It is important to test the robustness of these founding notions if we are to expand our theories to include the populations with which we now find ourselves involved.",
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language = "English",
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Re: The dark side of occupation: A concept for consideration. / GREBER, Craig.

In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Vol. 60, No. 6, 12.2013, p. 458-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

TY - JOUR

T1 - Re:

T2 - The dark side of occupation: A concept for consideration

AU - GREBER, Craig

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - Twinley (2013) challenged readers of this journal to reconsider notions of occupation as a positive and life‐affirming influence. Furthermore, she detailed ways in which the concept of occupation must necessarily include facets of life that are not commensurate with health and wellbeing, as well as those that are antisocial, illegal and/or immoral. The discussion is a critical one as occupational therapy diversifies from the select cultures and caseloads from which many of its theoretical premises were derived. I congratulate the author on a thought‐provoking article and I suggest that such a complex consideration of the relationship between occupation and health is pivotal at this point of the profession's evolution. It is important to test the robustness of these founding notions if we are to expand our theories to include the populations with which we now find ourselves involved.

AB - Twinley (2013) challenged readers of this journal to reconsider notions of occupation as a positive and life‐affirming influence. Furthermore, she detailed ways in which the concept of occupation must necessarily include facets of life that are not commensurate with health and wellbeing, as well as those that are antisocial, illegal and/or immoral. The discussion is a critical one as occupational therapy diversifies from the select cultures and caseloads from which many of its theoretical premises were derived. I congratulate the author on a thought‐provoking article and I suggest that such a complex consideration of the relationship between occupation and health is pivotal at this point of the profession's evolution. It is important to test the robustness of these founding notions if we are to expand our theories to include the populations with which we now find ourselves involved.

U2 - 10.1111/1440-1630.12098

DO - 10.1111/1440-1630.12098

M3 - Letter

VL - 60

SP - 458

EP - 459

JO - Australian Occupational Therapy Journal

JF - Australian Occupational Therapy Journal

SN - 0045-0766

IS - 6

ER -