Reclaiming a 'plausible narrative of progress': Rorty, institutions of hope and the MDGs

Alastair Greig, Mark Turner

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

Hulme and Fukudu-Parr (2009, 30) have recently traced the institutional evolution of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as an 'international super-norm to eradicate extreme poverty as a global responsibility'. In this paper, we examine the broader historical and discursive context that provoked such an institutional shift. Following Rorty (1999, 232), we argue that by the 1990s a 'narrative of despair' prevailed in development theory and practice that led to an 'inability to construct a plausible narrative of progress'. The social hope that Rorty called for anticipated the MDGs, which we label an 'institution of hope', following Braithwaite (2004). The paper begins with a brief assessment of the post-war UN 'decades of development' before contextualising the political economy of despair that Rorty encountered. Rorty's critique of neo-liberalism and post-developmentalism is then described, the value of hope as a collective motivating emotion explained and the MDGs as an institution of hope justified. The paper then examines a range of critiques of the MDGs, both radical and conservative, and defends the teleological targets set by the UN Millennium Project through drawing on analogies from climate-change mitigation. We conclude by arguing that the MDGs have performed a valuable symbolic role in reinvigorating global concern with poverty eradication, even if the MDGs themselves remain only a 'plausible narrative of progress' (Rorty 1999, 232).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTASA 2010 Conference Proceedings:Social Causes, Private Lives
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherThe Australian Sociological Association
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9780646546285
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventTASA 2010: Social Causes, Private Lives - Macquarie University, Department of Sociology, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 6 Dec 20109 Dec 2010

Conference

ConferenceTASA 2010: Social Causes, Private Lives
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period6/12/109/12/10

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narrative
UNO
poverty
development theory
neoliberalism
political economy
emotion
climate change
responsibility
Values

Cite this

Greig, A., & Turner, M. (2010). Reclaiming a 'plausible narrative of progress': Rorty, institutions of hope and the MDGs. In TASA 2010 Conference Proceedings:Social Causes, Private Lives (pp. 1-13). Australia: The Australian Sociological Association.
Greig, Alastair ; Turner, Mark. / Reclaiming a 'plausible narrative of progress': Rorty, institutions of hope and the MDGs. TASA 2010 Conference Proceedings:Social Causes, Private Lives. Australia : The Australian Sociological Association, 2010. pp. 1-13
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Greig, A & Turner, M 2010, Reclaiming a 'plausible narrative of progress': Rorty, institutions of hope and the MDGs. in TASA 2010 Conference Proceedings:Social Causes, Private Lives. The Australian Sociological Association, Australia, pp. 1-13, TASA 2010: Social Causes, Private Lives, Sydney, Australia, 6/12/10.

Reclaiming a 'plausible narrative of progress': Rorty, institutions of hope and the MDGs. / Greig, Alastair; Turner, Mark.

TASA 2010 Conference Proceedings:Social Causes, Private Lives. Australia : The Australian Sociological Association, 2010. p. 1-13.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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AB - Hulme and Fukudu-Parr (2009, 30) have recently traced the institutional evolution of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as an 'international super-norm to eradicate extreme poverty as a global responsibility'. In this paper, we examine the broader historical and discursive context that provoked such an institutional shift. Following Rorty (1999, 232), we argue that by the 1990s a 'narrative of despair' prevailed in development theory and practice that led to an 'inability to construct a plausible narrative of progress'. The social hope that Rorty called for anticipated the MDGs, which we label an 'institution of hope', following Braithwaite (2004). The paper begins with a brief assessment of the post-war UN 'decades of development' before contextualising the political economy of despair that Rorty encountered. Rorty's critique of neo-liberalism and post-developmentalism is then described, the value of hope as a collective motivating emotion explained and the MDGs as an institution of hope justified. The paper then examines a range of critiques of the MDGs, both radical and conservative, and defends the teleological targets set by the UN Millennium Project through drawing on analogies from climate-change mitigation. We conclude by arguing that the MDGs have performed a valuable symbolic role in reinvigorating global concern with poverty eradication, even if the MDGs themselves remain only a 'plausible narrative of progress' (Rorty 1999, 232).

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Greig A, Turner M. Reclaiming a 'plausible narrative of progress': Rorty, institutions of hope and the MDGs. In TASA 2010 Conference Proceedings:Social Causes, Private Lives. Australia: The Australian Sociological Association. 2010. p. 1-13