Redemption or forfeiture? Understanding diversity in Australians’ attitudes to parole

Robin Fitzgerald, Arie Freiberg, Lorana BARTELS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent Australian reforms to parole following high-profile violations are premised on a purported public desire for greater restrictions on the use of parole. These changes reflect the tendency of legislatures to presume that the public is largely punitive and invoke a ‘forfeiture’ of rights rationale that weakens support for offender rehabilitation. We consider whether restricting parole is based on a sound reading of public views. Drawing on a national study of public opinion on parole in Australia, we use a latent variable approach to look for distinct patterns in attitudes to parole and re-entry. We also examine what factors explain these patterns. The results support the conclusion that appealing to a public belief in offenders’ ability to change may be the most effective way to increase public confidence in parole systems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalCriminology and Criminal Justice
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2018

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Fitzgerald, Robin ; Freiberg, Arie ; BARTELS, Lorana. / Redemption or forfeiture? Understanding diversity in Australians’ attitudes to parole. In: Criminology and Criminal Justice. 2018 ; pp. 1-18.
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Redemption or forfeiture? Understanding diversity in Australians’ attitudes to parole. / Fitzgerald, Robin; Freiberg, Arie; BARTELS, Lorana.

In: Criminology and Criminal Justice, 2018, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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