Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model

Anthony King, Jeannie McLellan, Rachel Lloyd

    Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Paper

    Abstract

    Centrelink is the agency that has responsibility for the delivery of a range of Australian government services including income support payments and associated services. As such, it has a large infrastructure devoted to contact with customers through a variety of access channels - ranging from walk-in offices to e?mail. A constant challenge for Centrelink is the need to 'tune' this infrastructure in response to government policy directions, changing customer patterns, changes in customers' preferred ways of accessing Centrelink, and new modes of access.


    In this environment, and with aims of more efficient/effective service delivery and higher customer satisfaction, Centrelink has embarked on a Regional Microsimulation Modelling Project. The modelling work is being undertaken jointly with the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) at the University of Canberra.


    The purpose of the model under development, the Customer Service Projection (CuSP) Model, is to provide a tool that will assist decision-making through short to medium-term projection of customers and channel use demands at the small area level and under alternative scenarios of customer numbers, customer characteristics, access preferences and opportunities.


    The CuSP Model includes a 'classic' static tax-transfer microsimulation model, but this is just one element. Other elements include techniques that 'regionalise' the model, a projections and 'what-if' capability, extensive and detailed benchmarking to administrative data, and a geographical interface for analysis of model output (with GIS specialists assisting with this latter component).


    The paper describes the methods and techniques used in the CuSP Model, and highlights a number of particular issues encountered in this major extension of microsimulation modelling. These include issues with the extensive use of administrative data, spatial units and small area projections, customer behaviour and, importantly, the process of model development.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages28
    Publication statusPublished - 2002
    Event27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth
    - Stockholm, Sweden
    Duration: 18 Aug 200224 Aug 2002
    Conference number: 27

    Conference

    Conference27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth
    CountrySweden
    CityStockholm
    Period18/08/0224/08/02

    Fingerprint

    Service delivery
    Microsimulation
    Customer service
    Modeling
    Administrative data
    Government policy
    Government services
    Income
    Decision making
    Payment
    Customer satisfaction
    Scenarios
    Model development
    Underdevelopment
    Tax
    Benchmarking
    Responsibility
    Customer behavior
    Economic modelling

    Cite this

    King, A., McLellan, J., & Lloyd, R. (2002). Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model. Paper presented at 27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    King, Anthony ; McLellan, Jeannie ; Lloyd, Rachel. / Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model. Paper presented at 27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, Stockholm, Sweden.28 p.
    @conference{d605cd554b06487980f1dc37d7ce87e8,
    title = "Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model",
    abstract = "Centrelink is the agency that has responsibility for the delivery of a range of Australian government services including income support payments and associated services. As such, it has a large infrastructure devoted to contact with customers through a variety of access channels - ranging from walk-in offices to e?mail. A constant challenge for Centrelink is the need to 'tune' this infrastructure in response to government policy directions, changing customer patterns, changes in customers' preferred ways of accessing Centrelink, and new modes of access.In this environment, and with aims of more efficient/effective service delivery and higher customer satisfaction, Centrelink has embarked on a Regional Microsimulation Modelling Project. The modelling work is being undertaken jointly with the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) at the University of Canberra.The purpose of the model under development, the Customer Service Projection (CuSP) Model, is to provide a tool that will assist decision-making through short to medium-term projection of customers and channel use demands at the small area level and under alternative scenarios of customer numbers, customer characteristics, access preferences and opportunities.The CuSP Model includes a 'classic' static tax-transfer microsimulation model, but this is just one element. Other elements include techniques that 'regionalise' the model, a projections and 'what-if' capability, extensive and detailed benchmarking to administrative data, and a geographical interface for analysis of model output (with GIS specialists assisting with this latter component).The paper describes the methods and techniques used in the CuSP Model, and highlights a number of particular issues encountered in this major extension of microsimulation modelling. These include issues with the extensive use of administrative data, spatial units and small area projections, customer behaviour and, importantly, the process of model development.",
    author = "Anthony King and Jeannie McLellan and Rachel Lloyd",
    year = "2002",
    language = "English",
    note = "27th General Conference,<br/>International Association for Research in Income and Wealth ; Conference date: 18-08-2002 Through 24-08-2002",

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    King, A, McLellan, J & Lloyd, R 2002, 'Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model' Paper presented at 27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, Stockholm, Sweden, 18/08/02 - 24/08/02, .

    Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model. / King, Anthony ; McLellan, Jeannie; Lloyd, Rachel.

    2002. Paper presented at 27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, Stockholm, Sweden.

    Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Paper

    TY - CONF

    T1 - Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model

    AU - King, Anthony

    AU - McLellan, Jeannie

    AU - Lloyd, Rachel

    PY - 2002

    Y1 - 2002

    N2 - Centrelink is the agency that has responsibility for the delivery of a range of Australian government services including income support payments and associated services. As such, it has a large infrastructure devoted to contact with customers through a variety of access channels - ranging from walk-in offices to e?mail. A constant challenge for Centrelink is the need to 'tune' this infrastructure in response to government policy directions, changing customer patterns, changes in customers' preferred ways of accessing Centrelink, and new modes of access.In this environment, and with aims of more efficient/effective service delivery and higher customer satisfaction, Centrelink has embarked on a Regional Microsimulation Modelling Project. The modelling work is being undertaken jointly with the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) at the University of Canberra.The purpose of the model under development, the Customer Service Projection (CuSP) Model, is to provide a tool that will assist decision-making through short to medium-term projection of customers and channel use demands at the small area level and under alternative scenarios of customer numbers, customer characteristics, access preferences and opportunities.The CuSP Model includes a 'classic' static tax-transfer microsimulation model, but this is just one element. Other elements include techniques that 'regionalise' the model, a projections and 'what-if' capability, extensive and detailed benchmarking to administrative data, and a geographical interface for analysis of model output (with GIS specialists assisting with this latter component).The paper describes the methods and techniques used in the CuSP Model, and highlights a number of particular issues encountered in this major extension of microsimulation modelling. These include issues with the extensive use of administrative data, spatial units and small area projections, customer behaviour and, importantly, the process of model development.

    AB - Centrelink is the agency that has responsibility for the delivery of a range of Australian government services including income support payments and associated services. As such, it has a large infrastructure devoted to contact with customers through a variety of access channels - ranging from walk-in offices to e?mail. A constant challenge for Centrelink is the need to 'tune' this infrastructure in response to government policy directions, changing customer patterns, changes in customers' preferred ways of accessing Centrelink, and new modes of access.In this environment, and with aims of more efficient/effective service delivery and higher customer satisfaction, Centrelink has embarked on a Regional Microsimulation Modelling Project. The modelling work is being undertaken jointly with the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) at the University of Canberra.The purpose of the model under development, the Customer Service Projection (CuSP) Model, is to provide a tool that will assist decision-making through short to medium-term projection of customers and channel use demands at the small area level and under alternative scenarios of customer numbers, customer characteristics, access preferences and opportunities.The CuSP Model includes a 'classic' static tax-transfer microsimulation model, but this is just one element. Other elements include techniques that 'regionalise' the model, a projections and 'what-if' capability, extensive and detailed benchmarking to administrative data, and a geographical interface for analysis of model output (with GIS specialists assisting with this latter component).The paper describes the methods and techniques used in the CuSP Model, and highlights a number of particular issues encountered in this major extension of microsimulation modelling. These include issues with the extensive use of administrative data, spatial units and small area projections, customer behaviour and, importantly, the process of model development.

    M3 - Paper

    ER -

    King A, McLellan J, Lloyd R. Regional Microsimulation for Improved Service Delivery in Australia: Centrelink's CuSP Model. 2002. Paper presented at 27th General Conference,
    International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, Stockholm, Sweden.