Relationship between changes in haemoglobin mass and maximal oxygen uptake after hypoxic exposure

Philo Saunders, Laura GARVICAN, Walter Schmidt, Christopher Gore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Endurance athletes have been using altitude training for decades to improve near sea-level performance. The predominant mechanism is thought to be accelerated erythropoiesis increasing haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) resulting in a greater maximal oxygen uptake (V¿O2max). Not all studies have shown a proportionate increase in V¿O2max as a result of increased Hbmass. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the two parameters in a large group of endurance athletes after altitude training. Methods 145 elite endurance athletes (94 male and 51 female) who participated in various altitude studies as altitude or control participants were used for the analysis. Participants performed Hb mass and V¿O2max testing before and after intervention. Results For the pooled data, the correlation between per cent change in Hbmass and per cent change in V¿ O2max was significant (p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume47
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Hemoglobins
Athletes
Oxygen
Erythropoiesis
Oceans and Seas

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Saunders, Philo ; GARVICAN, Laura ; Schmidt, Walter ; Gore, Christopher. / Relationship between changes in haemoglobin mass and maximal oxygen uptake after hypoxic exposure. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 47, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 26-30.
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Relationship between changes in haemoglobin mass and maximal oxygen uptake after hypoxic exposure. / Saunders, Philo; GARVICAN, Laura; Schmidt, Walter; Gore, Christopher.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 47, No. SUPPL. 1, 2013, p. 26-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - GARVICAN, Laura

AU - Schmidt, Walter

AU - Gore, Christopher

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