Relative 'greenness' and not availability of public open space buffers stressful life events and longitudinal trajectories of psychological distress

Stine Bordier Høj, Catherine Paquet, Jean Caron, Mark Daniel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite evidence of associations between urban green space exposure and mental health, explanatory mechanisms and the role of green space qualities remain unclear. This prospective cohort study (n = 929) examined the distinct relationships of residential public open space (POS) availability and 'greenness' with four-year trajectories of psychological distress in Montreal, Canada. Stress-buffering and main effect mechanisms were tested under the respective hypotheses that POS exposures 1) attenuate the impact of stressful events on psychological distress and 2) protect against psychological distress independently of exposure to stressful events. Results from growth mixture models indicate that residing among 'greener' POS protects against rising distress through both mechanisms. Conversely, POS availability was not associated with trajectories of distress when holding greenness constant. Findings reinforce the need to consider the quality as well as quantity of public open space in urban environments.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number102501
    Pages (from-to)1-11
    Number of pages11
    JournalHealth and Place
    Volume68
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

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