Relaying Rio Through an Australian Gaze

Australian Nationalistic Broadcast Focus in the 2016 Summer Olympic Games

Olan Scott, Andrew Billings, Qingru Xu, Stirling Sharpe, Melvin Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored how potential national biases unfolded within the Australian broadcast of the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics. Applying social identity theory and self-categorization theory, this study content analyzed a total of 45 prime time broadcast hours of Australia’s Seven Network’s coverage of the Rio Games. Although the majority of top 20 most-mentioned athletes were Australian, non-Australian athletes were mentioned more frequently regarding total name mentions. Moreover, Australian athletes and non-Australian athletes were described in significantly different manners when ascribing reasons for athletic success and failure. This study contributed to the literature by uncovering how in-group members were portrayed in the Australian sports context while also providing insight into how consumers’ media consumption could potentially affect how the network broadcast the Olympics from a nationally partisan perspective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-220
Number of pages23
JournalCommunication and Sport
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

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Scott, Olan ; Billings, Andrew ; Xu, Qingru ; Sharpe, Stirling ; Lewis, Melvin. / Relaying Rio Through an Australian Gaze : Australian Nationalistic Broadcast Focus in the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. In: Communication and Sport. 2019 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 198-220.
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Relaying Rio Through an Australian Gaze : Australian Nationalistic Broadcast Focus in the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. / Scott, Olan; Billings, Andrew; Xu, Qingru; Sharpe, Stirling; Lewis, Melvin.

In: Communication and Sport, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 198-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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