Residential proximity to gasoline service stations and preterm birth

Vicky Huppe, Yan Kestens, Nathalie Auger, Mark DANIEL, Audrey Smargiassi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preterm birth (PTB) is a growing public health problem potentially associated with ambient air pollution. Gasoline service stations can emit atmospheric pollutants, including volatile organic compounds potentially implicated in PTB. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between residential proximity to gasoline service stations and PTB. Singleton live births on the Island of Montreal from 1994 to 2006 were obtained (n = 267,478). Gasoline service station locations, presence of heavy-traffic roads, and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) were determined using a geographic information system. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the association between PTB and residential proximity to gasoline service stations (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 500 m), accounting for maternal covariates, neighborhood SES, and heavy-traffic roads. For all distance categories beyond 50 m, presence of service stations was associated with a greater odds of PTB. Associations were robust to adjustment for maternal covariates for distance categories of 150 and 200 m but were nullified when adjusting for neighborhood SES. In analyses accounting for the number of service stations, the likelihood of PTB within 250 m was statistically significant in unadjusted models. Associations were, however, nullified in models accounting for maternal covariates or neighborhood SES. Our results suggest that there is no clear association between residential proximity to gasoline service stations in Montreal and PTB. Given the correlation between proximity of gasoline service stations and SES, it is difficult to delineate the role of these factors in PTB
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7186-7193
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume20
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Gasoline
Filling stations
Premature Birth
socioeconomic status
Social Class
Mothers
atmospheric pollution
Volatile Organic Compounds
Geographic Information Systems
services
station
Air Pollution
Live Birth
Public health
Medical problems
Air pollution
Volatile organic compounds
Islands
ambient air
Geographic information systems

Cite this

Huppe, Vicky ; Kestens, Yan ; Auger, Nathalie ; DANIEL, Mark ; Smargiassi, Audrey. / Residential proximity to gasoline service stations and preterm birth. In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research. 2013 ; Vol. 20, No. 10. pp. 7186-7193.
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Residential proximity to gasoline service stations and preterm birth. / Huppe, Vicky; Kestens, Yan; Auger, Nathalie; DANIEL, Mark; Smargiassi, Audrey.

In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, Vol. 20, No. 10, 2013, p. 7186-7193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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