Resisting the truancy trap

Indigenous media and school attendance in 'remote' Australia

Lisa WALLER, Kerry MCCALLUM, Scott Gorringe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are mobilizing a range of media forms to reveal, resist and shift what we term ‘the truancy trap’ – a simplistic, pervasive and powerful discourse of deficit about school attendance in ‘remote’ Indigenous communities that is perpetuated by mainstream media and Australian government policy. In this article, we draw upon Engoori®, an Indigenous educational intervention and research method, which provides a framework for moving institutions, organizations, communities and individuals out of deficit and into strength-based approaches. The Engoori process is activated here to surface and challenge the deficit assumptions that set the ‘truancy trap’, and as a lens for conceptualizing Indigenous media discussion, innovation and action on school attendance. The qualitative media analysis presented here reveals how a diversity of Indigenous media has been used in different ways to build a culture of inclusivity, belonging and connection; give Indigenous people a voice and reaffirm strengths in communities. The article contributes to international scholarship on Indigenous media as tools of resilience, resistance and education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-147
Number of pages25
JournalPostcolonial Directions in Education
Volume7
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Trap
School Attendance
Education
Torres Strait
Indigenous Peoples
Resilience
Innovation
Inclusivity
Research Methods
Media Analysis
Community Organization
Indigenous Communities
Discourse
Government Policy

Cite this

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Resisting the truancy trap : Indigenous media and school attendance in 'remote' Australia. / WALLER, Lisa; MCCALLUM, Kerry; Gorringe, Scott.

In: Postcolonial Directions in Education, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2018, p. 122-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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