Respiratory syncytial virus (Rsv) g protein vaccines with central conserved domain mutations induce cx3c-cx3cr1 blocking antibodies

Harrison C. Bergeron, Jackelyn Murray, Ana M. Nuñez Castrejon, Rebecca M. Dubois, Ralph A. Tripp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)
22 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection can cause bronchiolitis, pneumonia, morbidity, and some mortality, primarily in infants and the elderly, for which no vaccine is available. The RSV attachment (G) protein contains a central conserved domain (CCD) with a CX3C motif implicated in the induction of protective antibodies, thus vaccine candidates containing the G protein are of interest. This study determined if mutations in the G protein CCD would mediate immunogenicity while inducing G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 blocking antibodies. BALB/c mice were vaccinated with structurally-guided, rationally designed G proteins with CCD mutations. The results show that these G protein immunogens induce a substantial anti-G protein antibody response, and using serum IgG from the vaccinated mice, these antibodies are capable of blocking the RSV G protein CX3C-CX3CR1 binding while not interfering with CX3CL1, fractalkine.

Original languageEnglish
Article number352
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalViruses
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021
Externally publishedYes

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